2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study Mathematics.pdf

B write interpret and explain statements of order for

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number line oriented from left to right. b. Write, interpret, and explain statements of order for rational numbers in real-world contexts. [6-NS7b] Example: Write –3°C > –7°C to express the fact that –3°C is warmer than –7°C. c. Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its distance from 0 on the number line; interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a real- world situation. [6-NS7c] Example: For an account balance of – 30 dollars, write │ 30│ = 30 to describe the size of the debt in dollars. d. Distinguish comparisons of absolute value from statements about order. [6-NS7d] Example: Recognize that an account balance less than –30 dollars represents a debt greater than 30 dollars. 11. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. [6-NS8] Expressions and Equations Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions. 12. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents. [6-EE1] 13. Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers. [6-EE2] a. Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. [6-EE2a] Example: Express the calculation, “Subtract y from 5,” as 5 – y . b. Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms ( sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient ); view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity. [6-EE2b] Example: Describe the expression 2(8 + 7) as a product of two factors; view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum of two terms. c. Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). [6-EE2c] Example: Use the formulas V = s 3 and A = 6 s 2 to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s = 1 2 .
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6 th 2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study: Mathematics 51 14. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. [6-EE3] Example: Apply the distributive property to the expression 3(2 + x ) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3 x ; apply the distributive property to the expression 24 x + 18 y to produce the equivalent expression 6(4 x + 3 y ); apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3 y . 15. Identify when two expressions are equivalent (i.e., when the two expressions name the same number regardless of which value is substituted into them). [6-EE4] Example: The expressions y + y + y and 3 y are equivalent because they name the same number regardless of which number y represents.
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