The Clinical and Economic Burden of IBS Table 2 Healthcare Utilization Among

The clinical and economic burden of ibs table 2

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The Clinical and Economic Burden of IBS Table 2 Healthcare Utilization Among Patients With IBS Compared With the General Population*(37) Patients with IBS, General population, % (95% CI) % (95% CI) Study parameter (n = 53) (n = 10,787) Absenteeism from workplace or school due to illness during 2-month period 32** (20–48) 18 (17–19) Consulted family physician during 2-month period 83** (64–100) 38 (37–39) Mean number of visits to family physician during 3-month period 3.8** (3.0–4.6) 2.4 (1.8–3.0) Mean number of visits to family PA 1.1 (0.6–1.6) 0.8 (0.7–0.8) Consulted physical therapist during 1-year period 30** (19–46) 15 (14–15) Consulted specialist during 2-month period 25 (15–39) 16 (15–17) Consulted other therapist*** during 5-year period 32** (20–48) 15 (14–16) CI = confidence interval; IBS = irritable bowel syndrome; PA = physician assistant. *Data from the Dutch National Survey of Morbidity and Intervention in General Practice; **p < 0.05 vs general population; ***Therapist other than family physician, PA, or physical therapist.
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significantly more physician visits related to GI symp- toms in the previous year compared with those indi- viduals who did not meet criteria for a functional GI disorder (1.64 vs 0.09 mean visits; p = 0.0001). Patients with IBS also have a tendency to report and seek medical care for non-GI symptoms more often than individuals who do not have IBS (35,37). For example, in the US householder survey, individuals who met symptom criteria for IBS were more likely than those who did not meet criteria for a functional bowel disor- der to visit a physician for non-GI symptoms in the pre- vious year (3.88 vs 1.77 mean visits; p = 0.0001) (36). In a population-based study using data from the Dutch National Survey of Morbidity and Intervention in Gen- eral Practice, patients with IBS were more likely to have consulted a family physician, physical therapist, or other therapist compared with the general population (Table 2) (37). The authors noted that the high frequency of consultations with alternative therapists (more than dou- ble that of the general population) possibly reflects a failure of currently available traditional therapies to meet patients’ needs. Not unexpectedly, in the Dutch study, patients with IBS (n = 56) were more likely than the general population (n = 10,787) to report bowel symptoms, including pain (43% vs 7%), constipation (42% vs 7%), stomachache (30% vs 5%), and diarrhea (21% vs 5%; p < 0.001 for each comparison) (37). Moreover, patients with IBS were also more likely to report a variety of non-GI symptoms, including tired- ness (57% vs 31%), headache (55% vs 32%), anxiety (43% vs 19%), sleep disturbance (38% vs 16%), excitability (36% vs 15%), and apathy (34% vs 12%; p < 0.001 for each comparison). Finally, patients with IBS were more likely than the general population to report social problems, including difficulty with social inter- actions (15% vs 7%), interactions with children (14% vs 4%), loneliness (12% vs 5%), and partner relationships (11% vs 4%). These data add to a growing body of evi- dence indicating that patients with IBS report more psychosocial problems and nonbowel symptoms than do individuals without IBS (36,37).
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