Esci 274 waste management and health before

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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Before substantial state and federal regulation of waste began in the late 1970s, most industrial waste was disposed of in landfills, stored in surface impoundments such as lagoons or pits, discharged into surface waters with little or no treatment, or burned. NOT GOOD! Think of the damage that has been down to soil and groundwater over the years!
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Mismanagement of these wastes has resulted in polluted groundwater, streams, lakes, and rivers, as well as damage to wildlife and vegetation. High levels of toxic contaminants have been found in animals and humans who have been continually exposed to such waste streams
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste Depend on the disposal method !!! Open dumps : Water contamination (leachate) Optimal conditions for vector borne disease Physical damage
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste Depend on the disposal method !!! Burning waste  and  incineration : Air pollution Respiratory problems
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Incineration: Incineration is a waste disposal method that involves the combustion of waste at high temperatures. Incineration and other high temperature waste treatment systems are described as "thermal treatment". In effect, incineration of waste materials converts the waste into heat, gaseous emissions, and residual solid ash.
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health A waste-to-energy plant (WtE) is a modern term for an incinerator that burns wastes in high-efficiency furnace/boilers. This process may produce steam and/or electricity and incorporates modern air pollution control systems and continuous emissions monitors.
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ESCI 274 Energy recovered from waste: is it good? Managing Human Environments 1) cost X benefit 2) turns solid waste into hazardous waste ash 3) release particulates and other gases 4) reduces the drive to reduce, reuse, recycle
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste Depend on the disposal method !!! Landfilling : Accumulation of methane (anaerobic decomposition) Water contamination (leachates)
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Health hazards from  Municipal  solid waste
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ESCI 274 Other sources of waste Waste Management and Health
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health Most methods and strategies of waste  disposal, reduction, and recycling by industry  are similar to those for municipal solid waste Health hazards from  Industrial  solid waste The difference is in the regulations  and regulatory agencies
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ESCI 274 Waste Management and Health
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