However Gordons internal conflict never fully resolves as he claims he is

However gordons internal conflict never fully

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never fully resolves, as he claims he is “practically blind” without his glasses and cannot see. The final strip of the novel alludes to the infamous “Joker” character of the Batman series, who has not fully been introduced yet.Classic Picture Book:Sendak, M. (1963). Where the Wild Things Are. New York, NY: Harper & Row.Intended Audience:Ages 3-8.Genre: Fantasy/Classic Picture BookWhere the Wild Things are is a classic children’s picture book written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. The story itself is one set out to promote imagination and creativity. The book tells the story of a young boy named Max. The story begins with Max wreaking havoc through his parent’s household. As punishment, they give him no supper and send him to his room where the magic begins. Max’s bedroom turns into a mysterious and magical jungle environment filled with creatures called the “Wild Things.” The setting is as vivid and as imaginative as little kids tend to be. The environment is filled with a massive sea and a flourishing jungle. While there, Max tames the creatures and therefore is crowned their king. At first, Max enjoys his new setting but soon grows lonely and bored and much to the dismay of the Wild Things, Max decides he wants to return home. When he returns, he finds a hot supper waiting for him. The story itself is very concise, but manages to allow the reader to experience child-like imagination. The story transports us all to a time of adventure and wonder. The images are eye-catching and unique and create a sense of attachment to the unbelievable world the story takes part in.
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Fantasy Children’s Book:Babbitt, Natalie.Tuck Everlasting. First edition. Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1975.Intended Audience:Young Readers. Anyone between ages 7-12.Genre: FantasyTuck Everlastingis an American children’s novel written by Natalie Babbitt. The story itself covers the concept of immortality. The book follows ten year-old Winnie Foster, who is tired of her overbearingfamily and the small town of Treegap in which she lives. One day, whileWinnie is exploring the woods that her family owns, she sees a boy drinking from a spring. When Winnie attempts to drink from the same spring, the boy tells her that she can’t drink the water and that it’s poisonous.The boy drinking from the spring is named Jesse Tuck, who has a family, which consists of his brother Miles, his mother Mae, and his father Angus. Miles discovers Jesse talking to Winnie inthe forest and believes Jesse has already given away too much information, so he kidnaps Winnie. When Miles finally brings Winnie back to the Tuck’s home, the Tucks explain who they are and why they felt they had to kidnap her-explaining that the spring is magical and grants anyone who drinks from it immortality. They explain that they drank from the spring unknowingly and have had to hide from society
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so that no one can figure out that they are not aging.They also explain that a man in a yellow suit has been following them.
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