For an example we can look at any case where a person

This preview shows page 5 - 7 out of 7 pages.

or her life. For an example we can look at any case where a person is put on trial for murder, or assault. We may see these charges and immediately think this person is bad and deserves whatever they get. Digging into the cases and learning all the facts and the details gives us a different perspective on it. A good example of this to me would be during a trial a jury is brought in and these are people that are chosen and have no affiliation with the accused. They all do their best to be un-bias and sit there and listen to all the evidence. As evidence is presented and the story begins to unfold the jury can decide on what the final verdict will be. In the end the jury was able to see and hear about the person and the reasoning behind their actions, and not just judge them based of what their charges were. In today’s world this is how some murder cases end up with a self-defense verdict.
Q and A Rhods I believe that this is how we should treat everyone that we come into contact with in our lives. We may not know the reasoning behind someone’s actions and this is why we get to know their character before we judge. Aristotle says to judge people off of their virtues, but also mentions actions when he talks about this. “…someone who does not enjoy fine actions is not good; for no one would call a person just, for instance, if he did not enjoy doing just actions, or generous if he did not enjoy generous actions, and similarly for the other virtues.” (Morgan, 2005, pg 261). He is saying that someone that practices just action such as being honest, ends up becoming an honest person. Actions and virtues are pleasant in their own right. Based off of what Aristotle is saying a person can develop a virtue of being a trustworthy or reliable person by practicing these every day. Showing up on time to appointments, being there for friends and family in a time of need. If a person practices these everyday then they end up being a person that is known for being trustworthy, and reliable. With each virtue they gain these then add to a persons over all morals.
Q and A Rhods References Morgan, M. L. (Ed.). (2011). Classics of moral and political theory (5 th . Ed.). Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 49, 50, 51, 84, 85, 86, 260, 261.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture