Out of 16 points a poem may be unified by a theme one

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Question 36 1.6 out of 1.6 points A poem may be unified by a theme, one of the tropes, or by
Question 37 1.6 out of 1.6 points A quatrain contains 4 lines.
Question 38 1.6 out of 1.6 points The question of "The Tiger" is: "Did GOD create evil?"
Answer: e Question 39 1.6 out of 1.6 points Line 3 of George Herbert’s “Virtue” reads: “The dew shall weep thy fall tonight.” The word “fall” means __________.
Question 40 0 out of 1.6 points A metaphor is the imaginative identification of two dissimilar objects or ideas.
Question 41 1.6 out of 1.6 points Tennyson's "Ulysses" is a symbol of the existential dilemma.
Question 42 1.6 out of 1.6 points "In the forests of the night, /What immortal hand or eye/ Dare frame thy fearful symmetry" is from what poem?
Question 43 1.6 out of 1.6 points A harsh, discordant, nasty-sounding choice and arrangement of sounds is a(n)
Question 44 1.6 out of 1.6 points Examples of rhyme are masculine, feminine, neutral, and end.
Question 45 1.6 out of 1.6 points Samuel Johnson defined poetry as "The art of uniting pleasure with truth by calling imagination to the help of reason."
Question 46 0 out of 1.6 points Voltaire defined poetry as "The music of the soul."
Question 47 0 out of 1.6 points The last 5 lines of “Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley reads: “My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: / Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” / Nothing beside remains. Round the decay / Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare / The lone and level sands stretch far away.” The crumbling statue, “decay,” “colossal wreck,” “boundless and bare /…lone and level sands” all communicate thematic ideas of __________.
Question 48 1.6 out of 1.6 points In the poem “Virtue” by George Herbert, the line “The dew shall weep thy fall tonight” exemplifies __________.
Question 49 1.6 out of 1.6 points An octave is a ten-line stanza or the first ten lives of a sonnet.
Question 50 1.6 out of 1.6 points Lines 9-12 of William Shakespeare’s "That Time of Year…" reads: “In me thou seest the glowing of such fire, / That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, / As the death-bed whereon it must expire, / Consum’d with that which it was nourish’d by.” In these lines, the speaker metaphorically compares himself to __________.

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