Until recently the mesh topology was theoretical in

Info icon This preview shows pages 7–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
more connections you need. Until recently, the mesh topology was theoretical. In order to create the point-to-point connections between every computer on the network, each device would need a separate network adapter for every other device on the network. For example, if you had 50 devices on a network, each device would need 50 network adapters. This provides tremendous redundancy. A failed link can be compensated for by using redundant links. For this reason, this type of topologymay be implemented on a network backbone. However, it is rarely implemented on a production network with workstations. The number of network interfaces required make this topologyimpractical to implement. However, if we use a wireless networking medium, instead of a wired medium, the mesh topology becomes practical. If these connections were changed to a radio signal using a wireless network adapter, we would only need one network adapter in each of these devices.Each wireless network adapter can communicate directly with the wireless network adapter on any other device. Partial Mesh Topology 6:25-6:45 You may see a partial mesh topology. In this topology, some nodes are connected to all the other nodes using direct links, but some are only connected to one or two other nodes. This is less expensive and more practical to implement as compared to a full mesh topology. However, it offers far less redundancy than a full mesh topology. Summary 6:46-7:03 In this lesson we learned about network topology. We learned that there are two topology categories.There's the physical topology and the logical topology. The physical topology describes the way networks are physically wired. And the logical topology describes the way the network transmits data and operates. Topology is the term used to describe how devices are connected and how messages flow from device to device. There are two types of network topologies: The physical topology describes the way the network is wired. The logical topology describes the way in which messages are sent. The following table describes several common physical topologies: Topology Description
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Bus A bus topology consists of a trunk cable with nodes either inserted directly into the trunk or tapped into the trunk using offshoot cables called drop cables. With a bus: Signals travel from one node to all other nodes. A device called a terminator is placed at both ends of the trunk cable. Terminators absorb signals and prevent them from reflecting repeatedly back and forth on the cable. It can be difficult to isolate cabling problems. A broken cable anywhere on the bus breaks the termination and prevents communications between any devices on the network. Ring A ring topology connects neighboring nodes until they form a ring. Signals travel in one direction around the ring; each device on the network acts as a repeater to send the signal to the next device.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern