The third major idea of aquinas deals with christ

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The third major idea of Aquinas deals with Christ. Christ is the pathway for people to reach God. Aquinas wrote that God could "forgive sins without satisfaction; but because his justice and mercy could be best revealed through satisfaction he chose this way." Christ's suffering was seen as an offering to God, and showed the act had the character of merit. Therefore, according to Aquinas, God "merited" salvation for men. Christ was the bridge for people to attain God. Christ, as the head of humanity, affects "the forgiveness of their sins, their reconciliation with God, their immunity from punishment, deliverance from the devil, and the opening of heaven's gate" (Crystal). Aquinas strongly promoted the following of Christ to achieve the Lord. God, ethics, and Christ were the three most influential ideas in Aquinas' philosophical system according to his most recognized piece of work, Summa Theologica. 6 Rome: Summa theologiae The other important innovation from Aquinas’ three-year regency in Rome is Summa theologiae , his greatest and most characteristic work, begun in Rome and continued through the rest of his life. Summa theologiae , left incomplete at his death, consists of three large Parts. The First Part (Ia) is concerned with the existence and nature of God (Questions 1–43), creation (44–9), angels (50–64), the six days of creation (65–74), human nature (75–102) and divine government (103–19). The Second Part deals with morality, and in such detail that it is itself divided into two parts. The first part of the Second Part (IaIIae) takes up human happiness (Questions 1–5), human action (6– 17), the goodness and badness of human acts (18–21), passions (22–48) and the sources of human acts: intrinsic (49–89) and extrinsic (90–114). The second part of the Second Part (IIaIIae) begins with the three theological virtues and corresponding vices (Questions 1–46), goes on through the four ‘cardinal virtues’ and corresponding vices (47–170) and ends with special issues associated with the religious life (171– 89). In the Third Part, Aquinas deals with the incarnation (Questions 1–59) and the sacraments (60–90), breaking off in the middle of his discussion of penance. Aquinas thought of Summa theologiae as a new kind of textbook of theology, and its most important pedagogical innovation, as he sees it, is in its organization. He says he has noticed that students new to theology have been held back in their studies by several features of the standard teaching materials,
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