Here are some rules to follow for cell phone communication Do turn off or mute

Here are some rules to follow for cell phone

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Here are some rules to follow for cell phone communication:Do turn off or mute your cell phoneDo avoid Personal discussionDo not Cell phone for business at a social functionDo not Disruptive by talking loudly in public placesDo not Drive while conducting business conversationsDo not Place the cell phone on the table at a restaurant or meetingMost of these do’s and don’ts are common courtesy. Use of cell phones can be a distraction both to the users and to those around them.
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Although cell phones have become indispensable in business, observe the rules of common courtesy when using them. Participating in MeetingsOne of the most frequent oral communication situations for you will be participating in meetings. People need to get together to discuss how certain tasks can be completed within an organization.Some meetings are ad hoc, meaning that they occur for a one-time situation. Sometimes, they deal with routine matters, and other times, they can be emergency meetings.For the most part, however, your meetings will take place on a regularly scheduled basis. Departmental meetings, for example, can be weekly or monthly. Many companies have quarterly or annual meetings.As a meeting participant, you should observe the following rules for behavior:Stay on agendaParticipateDo not dominate by talking too muchCooperateBe courteousConducting MeetingsYour responsibility is greater when you are designated as the chair, or convenor, of the meeting.Your first task is to arrange the meeting, informing all participants of the date, time, and place for the meeting. E-mail is handy for arranging a meeting, because it provides a template for inviting participants and allowing them to respond. You might also want to attach an agenda, which is the outline of the business to be conducted. This agenda guides the meeting but can be amended as needed, following the discussion.Although most meetings are fairly informal, questions of procedure can arise. In these cases, as chair of the committee, you use parliamentary procedureto resolve such issues. Some common phrases you probably know are “I move that…,” “I second the motion,” and “Point of order, madam chair.”In conducting the meeting, you should follow these rules:Follow the agenda, encourage participation, control time, keep the discussion moving, control members, summarize both during and at the end of the meeting.Making PresentationsIn informal situations, oral communication is a fairly low-key expectation. However, the stress levels rise when you face the prospect of the formal presentation. This common fear is sometimes called “stage fright.” From the time of classical oration, oral presentation has created such fear.As in writing situations, formal oral communications involve greater expectations and, therefore, greater preparation on your part. In fact, thorough preparation is the best means of dealing with the stress level.
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