Zinc and health issues o Healing o Smell anosmia sometimes not able to smell

Zinc and health issues o healing o smell anosmia

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Zinc and health issues: o Healing o Smell – anosmia sometimes not able to smell foods (can’t smell when food is bad) o Taste o Circulation – Raynaud’s disease = enlarged body parts - Oysters are one of the best sources of zinc o Nuts as well and meat - Daily requirements = 10 mg per day - Fiber sequesters zinc (takes the zinc before it is absorbed) Selenium (selenite) (Se) - 55 micrograms (mcg) is approx. daily intake (very small) - Selenium functions as an antioxidant that works with vitamin E - It is part of glutathione peroxidase that protects cells against oxidative damage - Found in seaweed, seafood, brazil nuts, garlic/onion o Brazil nuts are the #1 source of selenium --. One brazil nut contains 95 ug of selenium o Tuna has selenium present enough that it is enough for the daily intake o Selenium is sustainably present and contributes to the odour of onions/garlics China produces about 75% of all the garlic in the world About 12 million metric tons are produced globally Calcium (Ca) - Most prevalent mineral in our diet. Most talked about mineral.
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- Intake varies enormously depending on your age = relatively lower amounts for younger children (approx. 700 mg) during growing years it is higher (approx. 1200mg) and then stabilises (approx. 1000 mg) o 99% of intake is for bones and teeth o 1% is for nerve transmission and blood clotting o The issue is more for women women tend to take in less calcium Intake Lost in urine Lost in stool Balance 250 85 265 -100 820 180 610 +30 o Point being you need to intake more on a daily basis - Dy. Sydney Ringer determined in 1883 that the body need Ca for nerve impulses to function - Gram is generally the amount needed for calcium - Calcium is sometimes referred to as a macro mineral because we need to consume large doses compared to trace mineral such as zinc and selenium Osteoporosis - It is linked to low dietary calcium - Not much of an issue for men up until the age of 60 and older - Major issue for women o Risk factors: short stature, underweight, early menopause, physical inactivity, alcoholism, smoking, excess caffeine, excess protein, excess fiber o Loss of bone mass for post-menopausal women: 1-5% per year (in males, 10-20 years later) Half the bone mass is gone is approx. 14 years - Rule of 70: take the number 70 and divide by the percent of change per time and the result is the length of time it will take to either double or halve (depending on whether the change is a decrease or increase) the circumstance in question o Ex. How long to double bone mass if it increases by 1% per year? Approx. 70 years o Ex. How long to halve bone mass if it decrease by 7% per year? Approx. 10 years - Approx. 9 million associated fractures world-wide (attributed to mostly women and weak bones)
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o Americas = 1406 fractures o Hip fractures are common 17% die within 3 months 27% die within one year o Loss of bone = increase of fractures What is the mechanism of calcium loss and gain?
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