Film language elements the key film language elements

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Film Language Elements:The key film language elements of this movie are props, costume and makeup, and onscreen and off-screen space. The props are important for helping the audience follow changes occurring in the story and for emphasizing barriers and connections. The director creatively uses a variety of props to communicate the advance of time and help the audience recognize the year in which particular events and scenes are taking place. Examples include license plate dates, car models, and greeting cards. Props also denote barriers and connections. For example, in one scene following the death of Miss Daisy’s wonderful housekeeper Idella, Hoke and Miss Daisy fix a mid-day meal of fried chicken together. However, when it is time to eat, Miss Daisy sits
Theology and Film Faith Review on Driving Miss Daisyalone in her fine dining room while Hoke eats alone in the kitchen. The separateness of the meal demonstrates the continuing barriers between them. Some time later, when Miss Daisy is alone in the dark during an ice storm, Hoke still manages to make it to her house with coffee and donuts. As he goes about making a fire, it is evident that Miss Daisy and Hoke will share their breakfast meal together and keep one another company. Thus, the contrast between these scenes helps demonstrate how the racial barriers between Miss Daisy and Hoke are coming down. Another important film language element is costume and make-up. At the time of filming in the late 1980s, Jessica Tandy was 80 and Morgan Freeman was 52. They both had to age over several decades as the film progressed. In addition, their clothing fashions had to age across decades with them. The careful use of make-up and costume maintain the reality of the film and help the audience realize the age of the characters and the decade at any given point in the movie. Costume and make-up, combined with props, make these time transitions seamless. Finally, the director uses onscreen and off-screen space in the film. For example, when Idella has a heart attack, the audience never sees her face--only her legs and the bowl of peas in her lap spilling to the floor. Similarly, when Miss Daisy goes to hear Dr. Martin Luther King speak at a dinner, we never see Dr. King. Instead we hear the power of his words in the contrast between Miss Daisy listening in the ballroom and Hoke listening to the radio outside in the car. Dr. King’s off-screen words are some of the most significant in the film as he proclaims, history will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the vitriolic words and the violent actions of the bad people, but the appalling silence and indifference of the good people.”Audience/Cultural Context Elements:Driving Miss Daisy looks back on race relations during the decades before the 1980s
Theology and Film Faith Review on Driving Miss Daisywhen the film was made and shows progress that Americans have made since the 1940s.

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