They have be common to the whole order insomuch that

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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 01
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
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they have be common to the whole order, - insomuch that among them all there is no appearance of poverty, or excess of riches, but every one's possessions are intermingled with every other's possessions; and so there is, as it were, one patrimony among all the brethren(Wars2.8.3; this coheres with Philo’s description: Hypothetica 11 )Here is part of Josephus’ description of the Essenes: 2. For there are three philosophical sects among the Jews. The followers of the first of which are the Pharisees; of the second, the Sadducees; and the third sect, which pretends to a severer discipline, are called Essens. These last are Jews by birth, and seem to have a greater affection for one another than the other sects have. These Essens reject pleasures as an evil, but esteem continence, and the conquest over our passions, to be virtue. They neglect wedlock, but choose out other persons children, while they are pliable, and fit for learning, and esteem them to be of their kindred, and form them according to their own manners. They do not absolutely deny the fitness of marriage, and the succession of mankind thereby continued; but they guard against the lascivious behavior of women, and are persuaded that none of them preserve their fidelity to one man. 3. These men are despisers of riches, and so very communicative as raises our admiration. Nor is there any one to be found among them who hath more than another; for it is a law among them, that those who come to them must let what they have be common to the whole order, - insomuch that among them all there is no appearance of poverty, or excess of riches, but every one's possessions are intermingled with every other's possessions(Josephus. Wars of the Jews 2.8, ; [For a good compilation of Josephus’ texts on the Essenes see -scrolls/josephus-on-the-essenes/)Separate Communities: Philo in several places says the Essenes lived in separate communities(See Joan Taylor p. 9 and Philo Probus 85; Hypothetica11.1.5; Ant.11.21) Josephus also says, “as they live by themselves, they minister one to another”(Ant.18.1,5)With no real evidence to connect the Essenes with the authors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there are some reasons to deny such a connection:A. Animal Sacrifices: Philo says the Essenes did not offer animal sacrifices, but the Dead Sea Scrolls specify animal sacrifices:There is a portion of those 30
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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 01
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
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NTNotesImperatopeople called Essenes, in number something more than four thousand in my opinion, who derive their name from their piety [see below, #91], though not according to any accurate form of the Grecian dialect, because they are above all men devoted to the service [therapeutai] of God, not sacrificing living animals, but studying rather to preserve their own minds in a state of holiness and purity.(Every Good Man is Free 12, )The Temple Scroll of the Dead Sea Scrolls (11QT)

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