When the dancing continued US Tribal Agents attempted to arrest Sitting Bull on

When the dancing continued us tribal agents attempted

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The Army ordered Sitting Bull to end the Ghost Dance. When the dancing continued, U.S. Tribal Agents attempted to arrest Sitting Bull on December 15, 1890. Sitting Bull was killed in the attempt, along with seven members of his tribe and eight tribal agents” (Nevada Magazine). Although the United States Army believed they had reason to intervene with Ghost Dance simply out of fear, the reality is that Ghost Dance wasn’t actually harming anyone, and should’ve been treated with far more respect rather than hostility.The case of Sitting Bull’s death wasn’t the only instance where the United States Army became quite involved with Ghost Dance. On December 28, 1890, only a mere thirteen days after Sitting Bull’s death, the United States Army tried to stop Ghost Dance once again, by taking away all of the guns and other weapons from the Lakota Indian tribe. This event became known as The Wounded Knee Massacre, because it took place entirely on the banks of Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. Because one Lakota Indian did not understand that he was ordered to give up his gun, or perhaps refused to do so, a gunshot was fired, which lead the United States Army to order open fire on the Lakota Indian tribe. At the Wounded Knee Massacre, 178 people were killed, including Lakota Indian men, women, children, and United States Army personnel (Nevada Magazine). This event and the event of Sitting Bull’s death brought a rather quick fade-
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out to the religion of Ghost Dance. It seemed as though Ghost Dance had left almost as quickly as it had become well known.Interestingly, Wovoka had quite a Christian influence after his father died and he moved in with the Wilson family. Because of this, it can be seen that Ghost Dance, while keeping in touch with traditional Native American beliefs, actually had much Christian influence. According to Legends of America, Wovoka “also told them to remain peaceful and keep the reason for the dance from the Whites” (Legends of America). Although the dance did bring some violence in the cases of Sitting Bull’s death and the Wounded Knee
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  • Fall '11
  • Tiedman
  • Sitting Bull, Wounded Knee Massacre, Ghost Dance

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