Current obstacles for e Learning in Ontario include funding government support

Current obstacles for e learning in ontario include

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standards, but standards and expectations/guidelines for creating online courses do not exist. Current obstacles for e-Learning in Ontario include funding, government support, leadership and direction. However, consortiums and partnerships have been key in providing the leadership, support, and direction of the e-Learning schools. There are currently three consortium groups in operation: the Ontario Strategic Alliance for eLearning ( ), POOL, and the French Language Boards who share their expertise, resources, training, curriculum development, teachers and best practice ideas among their schools. The Alliance consortiums have also developed some standards for online courses and a quality assurance process and provide training for schools and teachers at two conferences each year. In the Ontario Alliance there are close to 4000 students taking full credit courses and about 1000 in blended delivery. Across Ontario, there are an estimated 25,000 students taking online courses and this number continues to grow rapidly with the implementation of the Ministry's LMS. The majority of these students come from both rural and urban areas. They are seniors in high school taking courses they need in order to complete their high school diploma and to prepare for the university. They are taking these courses asynchronously,
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although blended models are growing, but not quickly enough because of the restrictions set by the Ministry. Quebec, Canada The Ministry of Education, Recreation, and Sports in Quebec in conjunction with the 72 school boards have funded and supported the integration of information and communications technologies (ICT) since 1983. By 1996, 85,000 computers were made available for the one million students in the province, now there are 172,000 computers available for these students. All schools in Quebec have access to the Internet which was provided by the governments Connectivity for Quebec's Communities ( ) program. The province wanted to first provide ICT integration and infrastructure for public access, focusing on schools, youth centers, and public libraries before using them for e-Learning. Computers are widely used in Quebec schools for teaching and learning activities, as well as for doing research and carrying out tele-collaborative projects in accordance with the pedagogical approaches advocated in the Quebec Education Program. Other current projects in Quebec are the Remote Networked Schools, ( ) a technology transfer centre may present this ambitious, large-scale project which is a vast inter-school learning project where students from a dozen small schools threatened with closure because of either remoteness or limited enrollments carry out online learning activities on the Internet. Quebec is also using the Connected Classroom series, which includes Quebec Reads, Quebec Roots, and the Learn-by-Doing projects. Other projects include the DECN e-Learning project in mathematics and science, the Prof-Inet for
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  • Spring '10
  • Roth
  • E-learning, Educational Technology, Virtual learning environment, Learning management system

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