Process priority by default the windows operating

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Process priority By default, the Windows operating system kernel tries to evenly distribute access to system resources to all processes running on the system. However, if a process needs to run with a higher priority than the other processes on the system, its priority can be manually configured. Right-click on the process in Task Manager, select Set Priority , and then select a priority level. Processor affinity In a multi-core or multiprocessor system, the Windows operating system kernel will automatically distribute processes across all available processes. However, a process can be constrained to run only on certain processors. Right-click on the process in Task Manager, select Set Affinity , and then mark the processors that the process is allowed to run on. System Lockups 0:00-0:06 Let's discuss troubleshooting system lockups. Types of Lockups 0:07-1:10 There are several different categories of lockups that you should be familiar with. The first is a temporary lockup. A temporary lockup only lasts for a period of time. It's usually caused by overutilization of a component in the system. For example, 100% CPU or Disk IO utilization can cause the system to temporarily lock up until the utilization is reduced. This type of lockup can be prevented by increasing system capacity, or by reducing the system load. Sometimes a system error will cause the computer to restart itself. For example, this could be caused by a failing hardware component, or a poorly written device driver. Instead of actually locking up, the error causes the system to reboot uncleanly. Hard lockups cause the system to freeze completely. For some errors on a Windows system, a blue screen describing the error is displayed after the operating system halts. On Mac OS, you may see the cursor turning into a pinwheel, and you can't do anything. This is sometimes called "the pinwheel of death". For other errors, the system just locks up and doesn't respond to mouse or keyboard inputs. Troubleshooting Tips 1:11-1:54 If one of these lockups occur, there are several things you can do to troubleshoot the problem. You can record any error messages displayed. With some lockups, such as a blue screen error, an error message is displayed that you can use for troubleshooting the problem. Use your phone to take a picture of the message. However, be warned that an error message is not displayed for some types of lockups, such as a reboot or a frozen system. You can use Event Viewer to look at the Windows log files. Look for any errors that were loggedbefore the system locked up. Be sure to check the application, security, setup, and system logs for errors. You should record which applications were running when the system locked up, and identify which hardware devices were installed or connected when the system locked up.
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