Tetrahedron triangular prism polygons cube net of

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Tetrahedron Triangular prism Polygons Cube Net of tetrahedron Instructions As you solve the problems, visualize the nets folding up into polyhedrons. Try to imagine where each part goes. If your group members cannot agree on an answer, trace around the poster board shapes to make the net, then cut out the net and fold it to see if it makes the desired polyhedron. Show work by identifying nets that are really the same but are laid out in different positions.
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 177 Cross out nets that do not work. 1. Decide which examples are nets of a prism. How many different nets that fold to a prism are pictured? 2. Which nets fold into a cube? How many different nets did you find? a b c d e g i j l h f k 3. How is the meaning of the word net as it is used in basketball different from the meaning used in mathematics? How are the meanings alike? ________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Describe the main method you used to solve problems 1 and 2. ________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ a b c d e f g h i
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 178 Third Grade–Fifth Grade Math Score! Students seek victory over story problems as they add and subtract scores from a past Division I women’s basketball championship tournament. National Standards: NM.K-4.8, NM.5-8.7 Skills: Identifying words that indicate addition or subtraction, solving addition or subtraction story problems, reading a tournament schedule Estimated Lesson Time: 30 minutes Teacher Preparation: Duplicate the Score! 3 worksheet on pages 180-181 for each student. Copy the tournament schedule onto the board or transparency. Materials 1 copy of the Score! 3 worksheet on pages 180-181 for each student 1 pencil for each student Background Information Tournament schedules work best when the number of participants is a power of two, such as 64, 32, 16, 8 or 4. In NCAA® women’s basketball, the Division I college teams are organized into four regions: the East, the West, the Mideast and the Midwest. At selection time 64 teams, 16 from each region, are invited to participate. In the first round of the tournament, eight games are played in each region. The eight winners play four more games and those four winners play two more games. Then the two victors play to decide the regional winner. The number of games played within each region is 15 (8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 15) which is one fewer than the number of teams in each region. To view or print the 2002 NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship bracket, visit . During the NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship, the winners of the four regions play in the two semifinals and those two winners play for the champion- ship. The total number of games played in the championship is 63 (15 + 15 + 15 + 15 + 2 + 1 = 63), which is one fewer than the number of teams in the championship.
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  • Fall '17
  • Statistics, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Basketball Fast Break, NCAA Basketball Fast

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