desktop publishing web graphics design Computer mapping methods Steps in making

Desktop publishing web graphics design computer

This preview shows page 8 - 11 out of 23 pages.

- desktop publishing. - web graphics design. Computer mapping methods Steps in making a map with a computer: 1. Gather data: base map, information to be portrayed. 2. Rough design. On a sketch, Locate title, legend etc., design symbols etc. 3. Set up map design on screen: neatline, internal boxes. 4. Use the drawing tools to trace shapes over the scanned map. 5. Discard the scanned image. 6. Add text, colours, symbols, any other features to map. 7. Print the map on paper and/or save file for further use. Raster and Vector graphics Two fundamentally different ways of making pictures. Raster - Image is made up of dots called pixels (picture elements)
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--- example: 1000 lines, each with 1000 pixels = 1,000,000 pixels. - pictures are built up by changing brightness or colour of some pixels. Typical painting or photo-editing software work like this examples: Corel Photopaint; Adobe Photoshop Vector - image is made of lines, shapes etc. defined by their coordinates. --- line segment defined by x,y coordinates of end points --- circle defined by coordinates of centre and radius --- line thickness, colour etc. defined by "attribute" codes Typical drawing , drafting and CAD software work like this examples: Corel Draw; Adobe Illustrator Comparison of raster and vector - consider a drawing of a triangle: --- raster: three lines of dark pixels on background of white pixels ------ all pixels are stored and drawn however many are actually used. ------ simple to draw and manipulate, but large file. ------ if enlarged or reduced, line becomes blurred. --- vector: three pairs of coordinates, a few attributes for width, colour etc. ------ more complex software needed to draw it, but small file. ------ line remains sharp if picture size changes (only coordinates change) - note: computer screen is a raster device. - Vector drawings must be converted to raster for display. Linework The main graphic element of the map - shows shapes of features (shorelines, roads etc.) - can be varied to distinguish different features --- solid ___________ --- broken - - - - - - - - - ................... --- thin or thick (weight of the line) --- patterned + + + + + + + --- single or multiple --- colour Lettering The main source of detailed information on the subject of the map - Title - the first point of contact between cartographer and map user - labels - placenames etc. - explanation of symbols, other map features - source statement - where did data come from? (if not entirely your own) - attribution statement - who made the map? - can be varied to distinguish features:
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--- case (CAPITALS, lower case, Upper and Lower) --- size (point size: 12 point etc.) --- style (Times Roman, Helvetica, Billboard etc.) --- upright or italic --- weight (normal, bold) --- colour Map contents 1 1. Title - keep it brief. Use sub-title if it helps. Give subject, place, date of subject if significant --- example: Population of Africa in 1955 2. Neatline - a box completely surrounding every part of the map including your name. --- EVERY map produced for this course must be enclosed in a neatline.
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