Marc Jove senior vice president of marketing is strictly against the idea of

Marc jove senior vice president of marketing is

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Marc Jove, senior vice president of marketing, is strictly against the idea of communicating the company’s CSR initiatives in an effort to gain empathy for the brand. He believes the firm should focus on selling their products, not its CSR strategy. A consumer will want to purchase and consume the product if it brings them a desire or need to have the product. Sharing the CSR strategy will not fulfill this desire or need, therefore it has no purpose to the product. He, like many Dannon employees, enjoys working for a company who gives back to the 5
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community, but does not think it is the right time to advertise their efforts. There are other steps the company must take before conveying their CSR strategy. He does not think it is ethical to use their CSR strategy as a tool to get consumers to purchase their products, as it would defeat their purpose of aiding society (Marquis et al., 2011). Jove believes Dannon needs to focus on continuing to educate consumers in the United States, as it is still an emerging market for yogurt. He also believes the proposed marketing strategy is too complicated for consumers to fully grasp, and that one specific category, whether it be nutrition, people, or nature, should be chosen to market towards (Marquis et al., 2011). As director of media, Claudia Sargent had to evaluate what a public CSR strategy would mean for the company’s public image. While Sargent agrees that the strategy is “nice to have,” she understands the reality and constraints the company would face when trying to implement such a strategy. From an external view, Sargent is aware that the company’s top competitors, Yoplait and General Mills, have strategies around saving lives and other CSR policies, so Dannon’s game changing tactic should focus on health and nutrition. Since there are budget constraints as well, solely focusing on health and nutrition would be easier to manage and market the company on. Sargent believes that having a marketing strategy around the company as a whole, rather than individual products would be more beneficial. Sargent is also aware of the “green washing” and “pink washing” effect that companies face when implementing CSR strategies, although this type of backlash would be undeserved for a company like Dannon, which has had CSR strategies at the roots of its foundation (Marquis et al., 2011). Sargent has valid concerns when thinking about the cons of this strategy, and that it might be too much. By dialing it down and focusing more so on health and nutrition, pros can be drawn out as it would allow the company to allocate more resources to make the campaign successful. It would also be a differentiator for the company when compared to its competition. However, on the negative side, it leaves more to desire from the public (Marquis et al., 2011). Following Sargent’s advice would leave people and nature without representation in the company’s strategy to promote sustainability.
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