7 high risk nutritional practices paper conclusion

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High-Risk Nutritional Practices PaperConclusionThe high-risk nutritional behaviors for all ten cultures discussed have had pasted down from generation to generation. The traditions and eating habits have been known to slightly changed based on evolutions of cultures. The African American culture has been struggling with high risk nutritional behavior since ancestry which was not by choice. The Amish culture doesn't change their eating habits often but when the do it is based on their environmental changes. In the Appalachian culture, they discovered ways to get around environmental changes since they primarily eat wild game. The Arabs continue to use what they have been taught to ensure they are meeting their nutritional needs. In the Chinese culture, they have been exposed to a way of eating since have not changed much about the intake of food. The Cuban culture have been consuming foods without proper knowledge of the food pyramid (Rodríguez-Martín, Innamorati, Imperatori, Fabbricatore, Harnic, Janiri, & Rivas-Suárez, 2016). In the European culture, they have continued to eat foods from other cultures which is why they don't have traditions of their own. The Filipino culture has used other culture to make their diets more suitable and to ensure they are eating based on their environmental resources. In the German culture their habits are still concerned barbaric which increase the diseases they have. Lastly, the Haitian culture still deflects improper nutrition due the areas they live in. Each culturehas been taught their behaviors either by their surrounding environment of cultures traditions. 8
High-Risk Nutritional Practices PaperReferencesDubowitz, T., Heron, M., Basurto-Davila, R., Bird, C. E., Lurie, N., & Escarce, J. J. (2011). Racial/ethnic differencesin US health behaviors: a decomposition analysis.American journal of health behavior,35(3), 290-304.Johnson-Kozlow, M., Matt, G. E., Rock, C. L., de la Rosa, R., Conway, T. L., & Romero, R. A. (2011). Assessment of dietary intakes of Filipino-Americans: implications for food frequency questionnaire design.Journal of nutrition education and behavior,43(6), 505-10.Musaiger, A. O., Hassan, A. S., & Obeid, O. (2011). The paradox of nutrition-related diseases in the Arab countries: the need for action.International journal of environmental research and public health,8(9), 3637-71.O'Neal, C. W., Wickrama, K. K., Ralston, P. A., Ilich, J. Z., Harris, C. M., Coccia, C., Young-Clark, I., … Lemacks, J. (2012). Eating behaviors of older African Americans: an application of the theory of planned behavior.The Gerontologist,54(2), 211-20.Rodríguez-Martín, B. C., Innamorati, M., Imperatori, C., Fabbricatore, M., Harnic, D., Janiri, L., & Rivas-Suárez, S. R. (2016). Eating Behaviors in Cuban Adults: Results from an Exploratory Transcultural Study.Frontiers in psychology,7, 1455. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01455The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume75, Issue 6, 1 June 2002, Pages 1098–1106,9

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