see Brodkin reading Article explains how a century ago Jews and other Europeans

See brodkin reading article explains how a century

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challenge the definition of “race?” (see Brodkin reading) Article explains how a century ago, Jews and other Europeans weren’t considered white and defined as nonwhite. It was only after WWII that Jews were included among the “white folk” The postwar boom transformed U.S. class structure, one where the middle class expanded to encompass most of the population, unlike before the war Most Jews entered the middle class and broke down these “racial barriers” by means of education, from which they obtained skills for well paying jobs This same kind of pattern occurred with other many Euro­American groups following WWII, but African Americans only became more segregated and discriminated against. Jews and other white Europeans benefited from the GI Bill and FHA and VA mortgages as forms of affirmative action, whereas African American men were denied such benefits from federal programming.
They were integrated into “whites”­ Blacks did not receive much of the affirmative action advantages Supports the definition of race­ because they began to slowly fit the socially constructed definition. Theories of nurture and culture began to replace theories of nature and biology. Instead of dirty and dangerous race who would destroy U.S democracy, immigrants became ethnic group whose children were integrated Indicates that the meaning of race is constantly changing What is prejudice? What is stereotyping? What is discrimination? What is the difference between individual and institutionalized discrimination? (see chapter 8, Brodkin reading) Prejudice = belief about an individual or group that is subject to change on the basis of evidence Stereotyping = generalizing a set of characteristics to all members of a group Discrimination = unequal treatment of individuals on the basis of their membership in a group Individual discrimination = overt and intentional unequal treatment, often based on prejudiced beliefs Institutionalized racism = unequal treatment that has become a part of the routine operation of major social institutions (businesses, schools, government, hospitals) Be able to differentiate between “assigned” vs. “asserted” and “thick” vs. “thin” identities. (see Cornell and Hartmann) thick identity : organizes a great deal of social life and both individual and collective action Ex: In south Africa, race was comprehensive aspect of social life. Everyone was assigned a racial category, and it told who you could marry, how you were treated. thin identity : organizes little of social life and action Ex: American Italians who like to follow traditions but it does not dominate their lives thickness/ thinness can change over time Assignment and assertion rooted in perceptions of “us”’ versus “them,” who “belongs” and who “does not” Assigned identity : ascribed by outsiders or by circumstances Asserted Identity : claimed by ethnic or racial groups

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