B social factors C organisational factors D psychobiological factors

B social factors c organisational factors d

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B social factors. C organisational factors. D psychobiological factors. Explanation: NO Question 795: An illusion of obtaining greater height above ground can occur when: A suddenly flying over small trees after prolonged flying over tall trees. B decelerating at low altitude. C flying over high terrain in low visibility. D accelerating at low altitude. Explanation: NO
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Question 796: After a cabin pressure loss at approximately 35 000 FT the TUC (Time of Useful Consciousness) will be approximately: A 30 -40 seconds B 5 minutes or more C 10-15 seconds D 3-4 minutes Explanation: Time of useful consciousness is variable and depends on the physical state of the pilot and their level of physical activity. It is worth remembering the following table as a guideline: 20,000ft - 5 to 10 minutes 25,000ft - 2 to 3 minutes 30,000ft - 45 to 85 seconds 35,000ft - 30 to 45 seconds 40,000ft - 18 to 30 seconds Question 797: Active errors/failures are committed at: A the human/system interface and have an immediate effect B the human/system interface and have a delayed effect C the system/system interface and have a delayed effect D the system/system interface and have an immediate effect Explanation: NO Question 798: Smoking cigarettes reduces the capability of the blood to carry oxygen because: A haemoglobin has a greater affinity for carbon monoxide than it has for oxygen B carbon monoxide in the smoke of cigarettes assists diffusion of oxygen in the alveoli C the smoke of one cigarette can cause an obstruction in the respiratory tract D carbon monoxide increases the partial pressure of oxygen in the alveoli Explanation: NO Question 799:
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A pilot, climbing in a non-pressurised aircraft and without using supplemental oxygen will pass the "critical threshold" at approximately: A 20 000 ft B 38 000 ft C 16 000 ft D 12 000 ft Explanation: The term “critical threshold” is used in many branches of science and can have many different meanings but we cannot find a definition appropriate to HP&L and altitude. The term “critical altitude” used has been noted in a training video for high altitude ballooning and they used a figure of 18,000 feet. All the usual text books point out that above that level, or thereabouts, unconsciousness is a certainty and there is an increased risk of decompression sickness. In Campbell and Bagshaw they point out that a „continuous flow‟ oxygen system is adequate at cabin altitudes up to 22,000 feet but above that a more sophisticated system is appropriate and, based on that and other requirements, they imply that 22,000 feet is a critical altitude. Hawkins doesn‟t set a level but stresses that it varies from person to person and smoking/non- smoking makes a great difference but he, and other authors, imply that flight above about 18,000 to 22,000 feet becomes „critical‟. Question 800: Tetanus is transmitted through: A Bacteria in the form of spores via a puncture in the skin B Food or water which has been contaminated C Insect bites D Droplets in the air cause by the breath of an infected person Explanation: NO Question 801: A pilot using a checklist is an example of the interaction within the
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