Rose C 2012 Ubiquitous Smartphones Zero Privacy Review of Business Information

Rose c 2012 ubiquitous smartphones zero privacy

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Rose, C. (2012). Ubiquitous Smartphones, Zero Privacy. Review of Business Information Systems (RBIS), 16 (4), 187. doi:10.19030/rbis.v16i4.7438 Chris Rose, DBA is an Associate Professor at Capella University. He holds a Master of Science in Management Information Systems, Nova Southeastern University 2002, Doctor of
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Corporate Responsibility, Government and Privacy Rights 13 Business Administration, Nova Southeastern University 2001, and Master of Business Administration, Nova Southeastern University, 1989. Dr. Rose addresses the tracking of Cell Phones via GPS, which was routinely done prior to the iPhone tracking scandal in 2011. He details the tracking IQ of the smartphones and the possible uses of the data, from advertisement generation, to police location. He noted that Apple after the revelation changed the iOS to enable the location services to be turned off. His conclusion is the tracking function the smart phones are a tremendous invasion of privacy and prior to that, most companies did not believe in privacy for phone users, as they relegated it to a function of the service. He attributed this to the wealth of the data, and possible uses for businesses. Sarpu, B. (2015). Google: The endemic threat to privacy. The Journal of High Technology Law, 15 (1), 97-111. Retrieved from ?
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(2), 543-555. Retrieved from Reema Shah, J.D. is an associate of Yale University Law School and editor of the Yale Law Journal. In this article Reema Shah looks at cloud computing in light of the Edward Snowden revelations and discusses the international legal implications of bulk data collections, warrant limitations, and the implications of the Patriot Act and other legislation. She discusses how the Electronic Communication Privacy Act (ECPA) is ineffective in the current era of terrorism and outdated and needs to reviewed and updated to the current level of technology and methods of computing as it was written in 1986. She also covers the Law Enforcement Access to Data
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