Results a paper chromatography table 51 data table 52

This preview shows page 5 - 8 out of 8 pages.

Results:
A. Paper ChromatographyTable 5.1 (data)Table 5.2 (report)SampleRfFe3+0.73Co2+0.24Cu2+0.47Mixture0.250.510.78Unknown0.490.80ID number ofunknownCIdentity of ionsin unknownCu2+ and Fe3+C. SolubilityTable 5.5 (data) ObservationsSample TestedAdd HClAdd NH3Solid CaCO3Bubbled into white foamTurns into chalky/milky lookingmixtureSolid CuSO4Turned green (crystals did notfully dissolve)Turned dark blue (fully dissolvedcrystals)MixtureBubbled/turned light greenDissolved, turned light blue andSampleDistanceFe3+4.0 cmCo2+1.3 cmCu2+2.6 cmMixture1.4 cm2.8 cm4.3 cmUnknown C2.7 cm4.4 cmMobile Phase5.5 cm
chalkyFiltrateTurns opaque blueSolid from funnelSolid turned light blue, liquidturned milky whiteTable 5.6 (report)Identity of water-soluble solidCuSO4Identity of insoluble solidCaCO3Explanation:The CuSO4 was determined to be water soluble due to it being the liquid left after filtering the mixed CuSO4 and CaCO3. The filtrate was identified as CuSO4 because it was blue like the solid CuSO4 and also shared the same chemical properties as the solid CuSO4. The CaCO3 was determined to be the insoluble solid. It remained in the funnel during filtration of the mixed solids and was identified because the physical and chemical properties were the same as the solid CaCO3.Conclusion:Paper Chromatography: The experiment matched our expectations in the hypothesis. We were able to compare the distance traveled by the known ions to the distance traveled by the unknown sample to determine that sample C contained Cu2+ and Fe3+. Solubility: After completing the experiment and analyzing the data the results did match the hypothesis. CuSO4 was found to be soluble in water, and CaCO3 was found to be insoluble in water. Upon adding 6 M HCl solution to the solid CaCO3, the solute began to dissolve but it did not dissolve the CuSO4. Upon adding NH3, both solids dissolved. Discussion:Solubility of a substance in chemistry is the amount of solute than can be dissolved in a given solvent. Solubility also depends on temperature. For example, salt dissolves much easier in hot water than cold. In that example, salt is the solute and water is the solvent. Thesolubility between solvent and solute depends on the intermolecular forces between the molecules. As the saying “like dissolves like” implies, when solvents and solutes have similar polarity, the solute is more easily dissolved.
Positive ions have varying affinities for mobile and stationary phases depending on what is used for either. The affinity a positive ion has for a phase is directly related to how strong the attraction of the positively charged ion is to that specified phase. This is shown in the distances traveled by the solutes in paper chromatography, a solute will spend more time inthe phase it has the higher affinity towards. The solute with a stronger attraction to the stationary phase did not move as far as the solute with a stronger attraction to the mobile phase.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture