Woroniecki Section 1-1 to 1-3 ROQ

Pure substances can be an element on compound the

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Pure substances can be an element on compound. The composition of a pure substance does not vary. Mixtures, contain more than one substance, and can vary in composition. Mixtures: We deal with mixtures everyday. Drinks, rain, etc. are all mixtures.
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Mixture – a blend of two or more kinds of matter, each of which retain their own identities or properties. The components of a mixture can usually be separated because they retain their properties. Homogeneous mixture – uniform in composition. (also called SOLUTIONS) Heterogeneous – not uniform throughout. (clay water, clay sinks to bottom) Methods of separating components include filtration, centrifuge, or chromatography. Pure Substances: Every sample of a given pure substance has the same properties, whereas the properties of a mixture depends on the ratio of components. Every pure substance has the exact same ratio of components. Pure substances can be elements or compounds, and compounds can be broken down into elements. i.e. water and electrolysis. Laboratory Chemicals and Purity: Chemicals in labs are treated as if they are pure, but most chemicals have impurities to some extent. Depending on agencies’ standards, the purity ranking of a chemical may differ. Purity of a chemical matters because they can affect a chemical reaction in an experiment Section 1-2 Questions: 1.) A physical property is a characteristic that can be measured without changing the substance, like melting/ boiling point, whereas a chemical property relates to a substances ability to undergo changes that change it into different substances, like burning charcoal in air, changing the oxygen around the burning into carbon dioxide. 2.) Tearing a piece of paper - physical change
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Melting a piece of wax – Physical change Burning a log – chemical change 3.) To decide whether a sample of matter is solid, liquid, or gas, I’d place it into a container and see what shape it takes. If it remains the same, it’s a solid. If it takes the shape of the container, it’s either liquid or gas. If it can evaporate into vapor, it’s a liquid. If it cannot, it’s a gas. 4.) Mixtures are a mix of two or more kinds of matter, that retain their properties, and can be separated, but have an inconsistent ratio of components. Similarly, pure substances can be broken down, but they ALWAYS have the same ratio of components if any sample of that substance.
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