SOURCE C Graham In Box Overload Arizona Republic A14 M Totty

Source c graham in box overload arizona republic a14

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necessary, and get receivers’ permission to send multiple attachments. SOURCE: C. Graham, “In-Box Overload,” Arizona Republic, March 16, 2007, A14; M. Totty, “Rethinking the Inbox ,” The Wall Street Journal, March 26, 2007, R8; A. Smith, “Federal Rules Define Duty to Preserve Work E- Mails,” HR Magazine, January 2007, 27, 36; M. Totty, “Letter of the Law,” The Wall Street Journal, March 26, 2007, R10; and “The Top 10 E-Mail Courtesy Suggestions,” Coachville Coach Training, March 22, 2000, . Social Media Concerns and Remedies—What Companies and You Can Do Of course some employees waste time. This has been and always will be true. But when it comes to social media, approximately 36 percent of employers now block employees’ access to social media sites at work (up from 29 percent in 2012). 69 However, evidence is growing that this strategy can backfire. Be Careful about Blocking Access Banning access can damage employee morale and loyalty—potentially leading to even greater losses in productivity. Some experts argue, and most employees would agree, that small breaks during the workday help boost productivity. Such breaks can take the form of going outside to get a breath of fresh air, talking with a colleague over a cup of coffee, checking personal e-mail or Facebook, or checking and sending tweets . 70 Companies must of course protect their own interests, such as lost productivity and legal liability. Many experts, however, warn against actually blocking employee access to social media or other websites. The costs could be larger than the benefits. They instead recommend companies create and implement other solutions. © Robin Lund/Alamy RF If these reenergizing benefits of social media breaks are not convincing Page 358 enough for you or your employer, consider other potential and undesirable results of the blocking policies: They could alienate employees . Young, old, or in between, many people are accustomed to being plugged into social sites throughout the day. Blocking their access can be off-putting. Moreover, organizations can block access on company devices, but most people have smartphones, tablets, and other devices of their own. As a result, many employees continue their typical use of social media but simply do so on their own devices—still on company time. You can’t have it only one way . If employers expect employees to be connected and responsive 24/7 to work-related e-mails, such as those from managers, coworkers, clients, or suppliers, it seems
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