judges decision was reversed and the convi ctions of the two retired NYPD

Judges decision was reversed and the convi ctions of

This preview shows page 83 - 86 out of 255 pages.

judge’s decision was reversed and the convi ctions of the two retired NYPD detectives were reinstated by a federal appeals court. The U.S. Supreme Court denied their appeal. 6 In 2009, Bernard B. Kerik, former New York police commissioner and nominee to head the Department of Homeland Security, entered federal prison after he pleaded guilty to eight felonies, including tax fraud and lying to White House officials after his nomination. Kerik was charged with accepting renovations to his New York apartment from a construction firm that allegedly had t ies to organized crime. He was described by federal prosecutors “as a corrupt official who sought to trade his authority for lavish benefits.” 7 Kerik was released from prison in May 2013 to serve the remainder of his federal sentence under house arrest. In October 2013, he began three years of probation and became an advocate for sentence reform. The New York City police department again made negative headlines in 2014, this time with alleged disability fraud, as retired police officers constituted most of the 106 police and firefighters who were charged with fraud leading to enhanced pensions. Prosecutors alleged that many of the defendants were leading normal lives, some even holding jobs in private security, landscaping, construction, and so on, while claiming to have become disabled as the result of their work on and after 9/11. Prosecutors estimated that the charged retirees collected over $21 million total. Over 50 suspects entered guilty pleas to Social Security fraud charges by June 7, 2014, and in August and September 2014, two former NYPD officers entered guilty pleas to charges that they were leaders in the fraud scheme. Joseph Esposito was ordered to repay $733,000, and John Minerva was ordered to repay $315,000. Both men received reduced prison sentences in exchange for agreeing to testify against other defendants in the massive fraud case. 8 4 “New York: Manhattan: New Anticorruption Chief,” New York Times (June 3, 2005), p. 4. 5 “Police Officers Were Hitmen for the Mafia,” Daily Telegraph (Australia) (April 8, 2006), p. 22. 6 United States v. Eppolito , 543 F.3d 25 (2d Cir. 2008), cert. denied , Eppolito v. United States , and Caracappa v. United States , 555 U.S. 1148 (2009). 7 “Kerik Gets 4 Years in Prison for Tax Fraud and Lies,” New York Times (February 19, 2010), p. 17. 8 “Six More Arraigned in Disability Fraud,” New York Times (January 10, 2014), p. 19; “NYC Scheme Ring Leaders Plead Guilty as OIG Issues Disability Fraud Report,” Of fice of the Inspector General, , accessed December 23, 2014.
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77 Allegations of corruption and other forms of misconduct have also arisen in other police departments, with the frequency and magnitude, along with media attention, greater in large departments. Supplement 5.7 discusses the Rampart corruption scandal in the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD).
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78 Supplement 5.7. The Los Angeles Police Department Under Scrutiny In September 1999, an officer of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) was apprehended for stealing cocaine from an evidence room.
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