Using to take precedent over such things as paying

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using to take precedent over such things as paying rent on time, purchasing groceries, or taking my cats to the vet. I never resorted to theft, pawning items, or trading sex or sexual favors for drugs. I strongly dislike the idea that drug addicts will steal from loved ones in order to maintain their habit simply because the drug has rewired their brains and constructed this new version of the individual whose principles and ethics have evanesced into the ether and were replaced with new morals which allow for pilfering and injuring those once held dear. I struggled with an expensive opioid addiction for nearly a decade, yet never allowed my morals to slip, never betrayed my personal ethics, and never lost my empathy. I’ve seen people steal and lie to maintain their use, but I suspect these people would have done the same without the addiction (though I do believe the addiction is the catalyst for such brazen behavior). In other words, drug addicts won’t necessarily sacrifice their moral rectitude and long-held principles to fuel, continue, or afford their addiction, however, those with lax morals prior to addiction will likely succumb to criminal, unorthodox, or immoral behavior. Some addicts, such as myself, will suffer the hellish consequences of withdrawal rather than pay bills late, skirt responsibilities, or harm relationships. Not all addicts are alike, much like every other group or demographic, and though addiction is a disease that alters the brains chemistry it isn’t always responsible for personality changes, rather it’s a crutch. Obviously, some drug use does cause personality alteration and I am not shaming or blaming anybody for anything, I’m simply stating that in my experience it is absolutely possible to be an addict and maintain a modicum of personal respect and preserve principles, ethics, and ideals.
Wilda’s Response to my Response: Rome WOW sincere kudos to you however I am sure there must be exceptions to all rules of thumb. Thanks for giving me pause to step back to reassess what I took to be factual! It is encouraging when anyone survive an addiction that can grip a person so tightly that it requires all and take so much while returning so little. Your insight into addiction is quite an eye opener (in some aspects) for me. Never thought that maybe addicts steal, lie and other negative behaviors because they would have done so in any situation? I agree that just like everyday people addicts are not all alike and we should not lump them all in the same basket. Rewiring of the brain chemistry during addiction is something to be aware of however once addiction is under control does the brain rewire to itself to its original state? My Response to Wilda: Wilda, The brain will usually return to its original state and essential "wiring" after a set amount of time. This time varies greatly and in some cases will take years to revert the damage done. There are some instances, however, in which too much damage has been inflicted and a return to factory setting is no longer possible. For opioid abuse, which was my severe addiction, it took some two

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