Since you dont want to manually edit the boot parameters on each boot you want

Since you dont want to manually edit the boot

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Since you don’t want to manually edit the boot parameters on each boot, you want to build a custom live image with dedicated boot menu entries. The first step is to build the custom live ISO (following section 9.3, “Building Custom Kali Live ISO Images” [page 237] and in particular section 9.3.4, “Using Hooks to Tweak the Contents of the Image” [page 239]). The main customization is to modify kali- config/common/hooks/live/ persistence-menu.binary to make it look like this (note the persistence-label parameters): #!/bin/sh if [ ! -d isolinux ]; then cd binary 244 Kali Linux Revealed fi cat >>isolinux/live.cfg </mnt/persistence.conf # umount /mnt # cryptsetup --verbose --verify-passphrase luksFormat /dev/sdb4 [...] # cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sdb4 kali_persistence [...] # mkfs.ext4 -L work /dev/mapper/kali_persistence [...] # mount /dev/mapper/kali_persistence /mnt # echo ”/ union” >/mnt/persistence.conf # umount /mnt # cryptsetup luksClose /dev/mapper/kali_persistence And that’s all. You can now boot the USB key and select from the new boot menu entries as needed! Chapter 9 —
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Advanced Usage 245 Adding a Nuke Password for Extra Safety Kali provides a cryptsetup-nuke-password package that modifies cryptsetup’s early boot scripts to implement a new feature: you can set a nuke password which—when used—will destroy all keys used to manage the encrypted partition. This can be useful when you travel a lot and need a quick way to ensure your data cannot be recovered. When booting, just type the nuke password instead of the real one and it will then be impossible for anyone (including you) to access your data. Before using that feature, it is thus wise to make a backup copy of your encryption keys and keep them at some secure place. You can configure a nuke password with this command (assuming that you have the package installed): # dpkg-reconfigure cryptsetup-nuke-password More information about this feature can be found in the following tutorial: 9.5. Summary In this chapter, we learned about modifying Kali source packages, which are the basic building blocks of all applications shipped in Kali. We also discovered how to customize and install the Kali kernel. Then we discussed the live-build environment and discussed how to build a customized Kali Linux ISO. We also demonstrated how to create both encrypted and unencrypted Kali USB installs. 9.5.1. Summary Tips for Modifying Kali Packages Modifying Kali packages is usually a task for Kali contributors and developers, but you might have specific needs not fulfilled by the official packages and knowing how to build a modified package can be very valuable, especially if you want to share your changes, deploy them internally, or cleanly roll the software back to a previous state. When you need to modify a piece of software, it might be tempting to download the source, make the changes, and use the modified software. However, if your application requires a system-wide setup (e.g. with a make install step), then it will pollute your file
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  • Summer '16
  • nushawan
  • USB flash drive, Linux kernel, Live CD, Live USB

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