This image bears its object darkening into memorial

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this image bears its object darkening into memorial shades Scattered bits of light No of water Or something across water Breaking up No Being regathered soon Yet by then a swan will have gone Yes out of mind into what vast
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pale hush of a place past sudden dark as if a swan sang Task: i. What do the shapes of the poems suggest? ii. How do the shapes enhance the delivery of the message in the poems? Stanzaic or Verse arrangement One of the features that distinguish poetry from other literary genres is the use of stanza(s). A stanza refers to a group of lines in a poem, usually set of from the rest by a blank line. Such groups of lines are commonly of more or less equal length. In traditional poetry, such lines would also be metrically equal and often have a rhyme scheme. Types of Stanzas There are a great number of different stanza forms available to a poet as shown below: a) Mono-stanzaic Mono-stanzaic poems consist of a single stanza no matter the number of lines. Such poems tell a connected story. Monostanzaic poems explore a single issue. Good examples are the sonnets. For instance look at the sonnet below: SONNET 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm'd; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd; But thy eternal summer shall not fade Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st; Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
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When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st; So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. ( Willam Shakespeare) b) Multi-stanzaic Multi-stanzaic poems have several stanzas that make a single poem. Multi-stanzaic poems express diversity in theme as they explore a number of issues in the same poem. The provide stanzas also act as pauses in performance. A good example of a multi-stanzaic poem is Richard Ntiru’s poem “If it is true”: If it is true That the world talks too much Then let’s all keep quiet And hear the eloquence of silence. If it is true That the world sees too much Then let’s all close our eyes And see the inner vision Beneath the closed eyes. If it is true That the world hears too much Then let’s close our ears And listen to the chastity of Inner music That defies betrayal By the wayward, wind. If it is true That the world moves too much Then let’s stand statue still And imitate the stubborn will Of trees That move without being peripatetic For the dumb don’t tell lies For the blind can’t be peeping-toms For the deaf cannot eavesdrop For the cripples can’t trespass.
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  • Winter '16
  • Brian Philemon
  • Poetry, Stanza

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