Scientific sociology tends to make us of quantitative data while interpretive

Scientific sociology tends to make us of quantitative

This preview shows page 7 - 10 out of 54 pages.

Scientific sociology tends to make us of quantitative data, while interpretive sociology  relies on qualitative data Interpretive Sociology is better suited to research in a natural setting where  investigators interact with people, learning how they make sense of their everyday lives Critical Sociology  (social conflict approach) Critical sociology:  study of society that focuses on the need for social change.  Developed in reaction to the limitations of scientific sociology, especially in the area of  objectivity. Karl Marx views society as ever changing, not as a “natural” system with a  fixed order, as scientific sociology views it. The importance of Change:  Instead of asking “how does society work?” critical  sociologists ask “Should society exists in its present form?” They ask more political and  moral questions.  Gender and Research  Gender:  the personal traits and social positions that members of a society attach to  being female or male.
Image of page 7
Chapter 2 – Sociological Investigation 04:41 5 ways that Gender shapes research: Androcentricity:  refers to approaching an issue from a male perspective. Can limit the  good sociological investigation Gynocentricity: seeing the world from a female perspective. Just as limiting as  Androcentricity Overgeneralizing:  occurs when researchers use data drawn from people of only one  sex to support conclusions about “humanity” or “society” Gender Blindness:  failing to consider the variable of gender. Double Standards:  researches must be careful not to distort what they study by  judging men and women differently. Interference:  when a subject reacts to the gender of the researcher.  Methods of Sociological Research Research method:  systematic plan for doing research Experiment:  a research method for investigating cause and effect under highly  controlled conditions Hypothesis:  a statement of a possible relationship between two or more variables The Hawthorne effect:  change in a subject’s behaviour caused simply by the  awareness of being studied Survey Research:  method in which subjects respond to a series of statements or  questions in a questionnaire or an interview. Population:  the people who are the focus of research Sample:  a part of the population that represents the whole Questionnaire:  a series of written questions that a researcher presents to subjects Close-ended question: provides questions and fixed responses. Is easy to analyze Open-ended question: allows subjects to respond freely, time consuming for the  researcher. Interview:  series of questions a researcher asks respondents in person. Can be open- ended or close-ended Participant Observation Participant observation:  a research method in which investigators systematically  observe people while joining them in their routine activities. Allows researchers an  inside look at social life in settings ranging from nightclubs to religious seminaries.
Image of page 8
Chapter 2 – Sociological Investigation 04:41 Secondary Analysis: 
Image of page 9
Image of page 10

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture