Particularly of people with deep expertise in

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particularly of people with deep expertise in statistics and machine learning, and the managers and analysts who know how to operate companies by using insights from big data. In the United States, we expect big data to rapidly become a key determinant of competition across sectors. But we project that demand for deep analytical positions in a big data world could exceed the supply being produced on current trends by 140,000 to 190,000 positions (Exhibit 4). Furthermore, this type of talent is difficult to produce, taking years of training in the case of someone with intrinsic mathematical abilities. Although our quantitative analysis uses the United States as illustration, we believe that the constraint on this type of talent will be global, with the caveat that some regions may be able to produce the supply that can fill talent gaps in other regions. In addition, we project a need for 1.5 million additional managers and analysts in the United States who can ask the right questions and consume the results of the analysis of big data effectively. The United States—and other economies facing similar shortages—cannot fill this gap simply by changing graduate requirements and waiting for people to graduate with more skills or by importing talent (although these could be important actions to take). It will be necessary to retrain a significant amount of the talent in place; fortunately, this level of training does not require years of dedicated study.
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