Both answers were very negative so they decided that

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Seeing Through Statistics
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Chapter 26 / Exercise 15
Seeing Through Statistics
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Both answers were very negative, so they decided that it was best for the business and the environment to look at other alternatives to diesel and the use of generators throughout the property. They started by investigating where they were using energy including lighting, refrigeration and made small changes like switching off appliances and lights overnight around the property, changing light bulbs and changing their food menus. They then followed this up with an in-depth look at how much energy they were using in the resort and what emissions they were contributing into the environment. The first step was to record their energy use. This was undertaken for four months to ensure there was good base information to cover all the different scenarios of the business. Choosing the right solar power system was also important, so time was spent researching the options and assessing available government rebates. After 18 months of researching and decision making as to which solar power system to purchase, construction was completed in just 10 days.
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Seeing Through Statistics
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Chapter 26 / Exercise 15
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36 | P a g e Other activities considered to support the environment were: vegetation and plants lost due to construction have been replaced and areas re-vegetated minimising waste by composting food and paper products for use in the garden educating guests and the public on the importance of protecting wildlife building low impact walking tracks recycling all aluminium cans continuing to plant native trees and vegetation building with local timber. Outcomes Hidden Valley Cabins is now saving 78 tonnes of CO2 emissions per year along with an estimated $45, 000 per year in diesel fuel. Calculating this over a 20 year period and a minimum 5% increase per year in the price of diesel, this equates to $1.2 million in sa vings. The choice to go ‘green’ has also helped to offset a lot of their other business expenses. The success with the implementation of solar power has encouraged them to continue making improvements. After commissioning a formal audit they identified and purchased enough carbon credits for the property to be recognised as carbon neutral. They followed this with a comprehensive review by Ecotourism Australia. Hidden Valley Cabins were awarded Advanced Ecotourism certification. (Source: Tourism Queensland, September 2009) Life cycle management Life cycle management uses a process called life cycle assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental impacts associated with a product, process or service throughout its life cycle, from the extraction of raw materials through to processing, transport, use, reuse, recycling or disposal. For each of these stages, the impact is measured in terms of resources used and environmental impacts caused. Life cycle assessment is a cradle-to-grave analysis of a product or service. LCA can help a business identify the most effective improvement than can be made in terms of environmental impacts and use of resources.
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