Each of the names had a specific meaning in spanish

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gender inequality that existed at the time. Each of the names had a specific meaning in Spanish. Angustias, the eldest and ugliest of the daughters, had a name meaning physical or mental anguish. Actions like the spilling of salt were omens of bad luck and death. Even the house itself held a deeper poetic meaning, representing the oppression of women during the Spanish Civil War. Pepe is responsible for all the action in the play and is such an influential figure that he is able to challenge Bernarda’s control and cause mutiny in the house thus establishes his supremacy over Bernarda as the protagonist The house of Bernarda Alba, forms a play expressing what Federico Garcia Lorca saw as the tragic life of Spanish women. In this play one of the maids, Poncia, is forced to be in the middle of much of the drama consuming this house. She, Poncia, can be looked at as both a protagonist and an antagonist. Bernalda alba also represents facism Arturo Uslar Pietri - He was born in Carracas, Venezuela in 1906 and died in 2001 - He studied political science at the Central University of Venezuela. - He married Isabel Braun Kerdel, and they had two children. - He worked as minister of education, minister of internal relations, was a founding member of the Democratic Party of Venezuela, senator, professor of Latin American literature at Columbia University in New York, and in 1963 he participated as a presidential candidate but lost. - Their ancestors: - Juan Uslar: fought in the war of independence of Venezuela.
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- Juan Pietri: was president of the Council - He said that his ancestors were also: Simón Bolívar, Carlos Soublette and Juan Pablo Rojas Paúl. - A very important period for your life. - He had contact with Paul Valéry, Robert Desnos and André Breton, Ramón Gómez de la Serna, Miguel Ángel Asturias and Alejo Carpentier - Ramón Gómez de la Serna, Miguel Ángel Asturias and Alejo Carpentier were his main inspirations - He said that during his years in Paris he invented magical realism - He wrote essays, stories, poetry, novels, speeches, tributes, and theaters. - One of the best-known Venezuelan writers of the 20th century - He won the title of «creator of the Modern Latin American Historical Novel» - His book Barrabas y Ortos Relatos began his literary career. - His novel Las lanzas coloradas, launched magical realism. 1931 - He wanted his readers to be beyond the ideas of his time - Dictator for 27 years. - He was president between the years 1908-1913, 1922-1929 and 1931-1935 - Known as the man who enriched the country, but much of the money remained in the hands of his regime and gave much power to the United States - Form of the essay: Argumentative presentation (persuasive) and dialogue. - Role of the essayist: Inform Venezuelan citizens about the state of Venezuela in the context of their identity and culture. - Thesis: "Two great poles of absorption predominate over the Latin American world of our days ... .influence of the civilization of the United States of America ... ..models of the socialist world of Russia." - Comparisons (main estragaría) - Capitalism: - -TV and cinema - -The publications: LIFE in Spanish, Selections of Reader's Digest, Good Home, Vision - The American language: Hippie, Okey, Super, Extra - Opinion formation - Socialism: - Student movements - Education system -
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