The source stress can affect your physical

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the source, stress can affect your physical, mental/emotional, and social health. Learning how to manage stress is an impor- tant part of staying healthy. Stress in Your Life ow much stress you feel depends in part on your perception H of events that cause stress. is the act of becoming aware through the senses. One way to manage stress is to change how you perceive and react to events that cause it. Imagine, for example, that you and your best friend have just had an argument. You believe that this disagreement has destroyed your friendship. Your friend, on the other hand, sees the argument as a simple disagreement that you will eventually work out. Because of your perception of the event, you are more likely to experience a higher level of stress than your friend. Perception Stress
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Reacting to Stress tress is not necessarily good or bad in S and of itself, but it can have positive or negative effects. It can motivate you to do your best and give you the extra energy you need to reach your goals. For example, some people may perform better under the stress of competition. However, the effects of stress can be unhealthy at times. Losing sleep after arguing with a friend or being so worried about a test that you don’t perform well are examples of the negative effects of stress. What Causes Stress? o learn how to manage stress, you need to know what causes it. T A is anything that causes stress. People, objects, places, events, and situations are all potential stressors. Some stressors affect almost everyone in a similar way. The sound of a siren, for example, heightens alertness in most people. Other stressors affect different people in different ways. Going to a new school, for example, can cause anticipation in some people but a sense of anx- iety in others. Psychologists have identified five general categories of stressors: Biological stressors, such as illnesses, disabilities, or injuries Environmental stressors, such as poverty, pollution, crowding, noise, or natural disasters Cognitive, or thinking, stressors, such as the way you perceive a situation or how it affects you and the world around you Personal behavior stressors, such as negative reactions in the body and mind caused by using tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs or by a lack of physical activity Life situation stressors, such as the death of a pet, the separation or divorce of parents, or having trouble in relationships with peers Part of how you perceive these stressors has to do with your past experiences. If you had a positive experience the first time you par- ticipated in a school play, you’ll probably look forward to future performances. On the other hand, if you experienced stage fright, you may feel anxious about being involved in similar events. Your attitudes, values, and beliefs also play a role.
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