Emotion, Motivation, Stress.doc

States and c how stress affects a person

Info icon This preview shows pages 5–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
states, and (c) how stress affects a person psychologically (such as feeling panicky or overwhelmied) and physiologically (such as experiencing rapid heart rate or quickened breathing). 10. The arousal of fear, for example, is associated with the action tendency to flee from a potentially threatening or dangerous event. Anger, by contrast, is associated with the action tendency to fight in self-defense. Surprise is associated with actions intended to increase sensory intake to find out about an unexpected event that has startled us. Each of these action tendencies is likely to have helped humans function more capably in their environments. 11. We can cope by (a) altering our perceptions and interpretations of events that make them stressful (remembering that stress begins with the perception of events as threatening or dangerous), (b) altering the physiological effects of stress (such as by guided relaxation, meditation or deep breathing), and (c) creating and maintaining a healthy lifestyle (including eating well and getting regular exercise to build the body's coping capacities, and finding social support). 12. The General Adaptation Syndrome describes our physical and psychological response to stressful events if the stress continues to persist. Phase 1, Alarm, involves the quick mobilization of the body's resources for coping. Phase 2, Resistance, involves continued activation, but some signs of physiological arousal (such as rapid heart rate) may subside. Phase 3, Collapse or Exhaustion, is when the body's resources become depleted, coping is undermined, adn the person gradually fails. Fill in the Blank 13. needs 14. hypothalamus 15. attachment 16. emotions 17. maximize, minimize, neutralize, mask 18. psychoneuroimmunology 19. stress Matching 5
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
20. b (motivation) 21. a (secondary emotions) 22. c (security of attachment) 23. d (the five basic elements of emotion) 24. e (internal locus of control) 6
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern