In this scene however the hero of The Big Sleep does not appear to overtly win

In this scene however the hero of the big sleep does

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is suspicious. In this scene, however, the hero of The Big Sleep does not appear to overtly win any kind ofbattle. In fact, it may seem as though he is a bit overpowered: Marlowe is not able to leave the scene in Geiger's house until Eddie Mars "allows" him to, for fear of his own safety. Furthermore, Marlowe is unarmed. In his search for the truth, Marlowe has a formidable opponent.#14#15The fact that everyone in the novel is involved of some kind of criminal activity—even Marlowe, who has committed a crime by not relaying what he knows to the police—we are fully immersed in the variousshades of the seedy side of Los Angeles Chandler is trying to portray.#16#17This section also further explores Marlowe's nobility and the idea of homosexuality. Carol Lundgren, Geiger's lover, has apparently killed for love, and has affectionately wrapped Geiger's body and surrounded it with incense. Such an act seems endearing, almost beautiful. Marlowe had been hard on Lundgren at the beginning of the chapter that includes the finding of the body. Now, however, when Marlowe actually sees the body, it seems for a moment that he feels empathy for the boy. After having called Lundgren all kinds of names and after beating him to a pulp, after he finds the body Marlowe asks, "Want to sit up, son?" Though Marlowe may be delivering this line with a hint of sarcasm, it seems so outof place that we cannot help but wonder whether Marlowe feels true sympathy for the boy's love. This is not to say that Marlowe has not spoken of—and will not continue to speak of—homosexuality in derogatory terms, using words like "queen," for example. Indeed, Marlowe does continue to be a homophobic character, perhaps merely a product of the society of his time. Nonetheless, it is important that other relationships in the novel—such as that between General Sternwood and Rusty Regan, for instance—do at times appear to be associated with homosexual overtones.#18Ohls appears at the house. Marlowe tells him what has occurred, showing him Geiger's body in the bedroom. They then make their way then to the home of Taggart Wilde, the District Attorney. Marlowe explains to the D.A. and Captain Cronjager what went on, leaving out the pieces of the story he has planned to leave out the whole time—the pieces about Carmen Sternwood. From the conversation, we getthe sense that there is a clear rivalry between the private detective and the "coppers."During the conversation it is implied that Marlowe is in some kind of trouble—or at least could be—for withholding information from the law. Marlowe hands Lundgren over to police custody. The D.A. tells Marlowe that any cop would be upset about the cover-up, and that Marlowe will have to make statements about what he has just said. The D.A. agrees to attempt to keep General Sternwood out of the killings, andeven agrees to report them as two separate killings. The D.A. appears to refrain from accusing Marlowe because he seems to admire that Marlowe is doing detective work for a pauper's fee. The D.A. also is

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