Excessive Interview Questions How does the school attempt to involve parents

Excessive interview questions how does the school

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Excessive Interview Questions How does the school attempt to involve parents? What do you as a teacher to communicate with parents? How frequently do you meet with parents to discuss child progress? Home-School communication Written Communication Happy Grams and Special Accomplishment Letters Two-Way Home-School Reporting forms Dialogue notebooks Home-School contracts Class Newsletters and Websites Telephone Communication Phone calls Voice Mail Email and Text Messaging Other Forms of Parent involvement Parent as Tutors o Systematically teach self-help and daily living skills to their children Parent Education and Support Groups o Provide education for parenting Parent-to-Parent groups
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Chapter 4-15 Disability/causes, etiology Definition/issues in identifying Characteristics of the learner General teaching methods (usually 1-2 per chapter) Specific teaching methods (few) Issues present/future Focus Questions What implications for special education does viewing intellectual disabilities as an inherent trait within the individual or as a state of functioning that reflects the fit between a person’s capacities and the contexts in which the person is to function? What should teachers know about IQ tests and the assessment of intellectual functioning? Which is more important in determining a person’s level of adaptive functioning: intellectual capability or a supportive environment? How are the characteristics of a student with intellectual disabilities relevant to planning and delivering instruction? Definitions of intellectual Disability (ID) (Special Education) IDEA Definition Significantly sub-average intellectual functioning Deficits in adaptive behavior Manifested during the developmental period
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Three criteria for a diagnosis Significant sub-average intellectual functioning- a score of two or more standard deviations below the mean on standardized intelligence tests An individual must also have significant default with adaptive behavior The deficits in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior must occur during the developmental period to help distinguish intellectual disabilities from other disabilities (Everything else) AAIDD 2002 definition Intellectual disability is characterized by significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior as expressed in conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills. This disability originates before age 18 Five Assumptions essential to applying the definition Limitations in present functioning must be considered within the context of community environments typical of the individuals age peers and culture Valid assessment considers cultural and linguistic diversity as well as differences in communication, sensory, motor and behavioral factors
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