The number of moles of the other gases and record it

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the number of moles of the other gases and record it using three significant digits. Explain why this gas seems to deviate from the others. 5. Calculate the number of molecules of butane in the flask. Avogadro’s number is molecules/mol.
6. Even though the number of molecules in 1.00 atm of a gas at constant pressure and temperature is always the same, the number of atoms varies depending on the gas. How many atoms are in the flask of methane?
7. Calculate and record the following data in the table below. Propane Butane Methane Molar Volume (L) 24.1 24.1 24.1 Average Molar Volume (L) 24.1 8. This experiment was performed using 1.00 atm of gas at 294.6 K. However, STP conditions are 1.00 atm and 273.15 K. Use the Ideal Gas Law to calculate the volume that the same number of moles of gas will occupy at STP. Calculate the molar volume at STP. How does your STP molar volume compare to the known value of 22.4 L? R is 0.0820 L atm mol –1 K –1 . Record your data in the table below.
4/5/2017 Late Nite Labs It is the same as the known value of 22.4 L Conclusions 1. Suppose 0.274 mol of a gas occupy 6.62 L at a given temperature and pressure. What volume will 0.878 mol occupy at the same temperature and pressure?
4. Suppose a student performed a similar experiment using pentane and hexane as his gases. Pentane Hexane Molar Mass (g/mol) 72.15 86.18 Mass (g) 0.541 0.646 Given the data in the figure above, which gas will occupy a larger volume at STP?
2. Use Avogadro’s Law to explain why a flat tire takes up less space than an inflated tire.
3. What mass of propane will occupy the same volume as 0.057 mol of butane at 1.00 atm and 298 K?

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