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muscoskeletal system.docx

The musculoskeletal system review image diversity

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The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: osseous tissue osteoblasts osteocytes osteoclasts 8. What is bone matrix? What are its main components? Bone matrix is the content that fills the intercellular space of osseous tissue. Bone matrix is made of mineral substances (about 5%), mainly phosphorus and calcium salts, as well as organic substances (95%), mainly collagen, glycoproteins and proteoglycans. The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: bone matrix
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9. What are the Haversian canals and the Volkmann’s canals of the bones? Is osseous tissue vascularized? The Haversian canals are longitudinal canals present in osseous tissue within which blood vessels and nerves pass. Osseous tissue distributes itself in a concentric manner around these canals. The Volkmann’s canals are communications between the Harvesian canals. Osseous tissue is highly vascularized in its interior. The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: bone anatomy 10. What are the functions of osseous tissue? The main functions of osseous tissue are: to provide structural rigidity to the body and to delineate the spatial positioning of the other tissues and organs; to support the weight of the body; to serve as a site for mineral storage, mainly of calcium and phosphorus; to form protective structures for important organs such as the brain, the spinal cord, the heart and the lungs; to work as a lever and support for the muscles, providing movement; and to contain the bone marrow where hematopoiesis occurs. 11. What are flat bones and long bones?
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The main bones of the body can be classified as flat or long bones (some bones are not classified according to these categories). Examples of flat bones are the skull, the ribs, the hipbones, the scapulae and the sternum. Examples of long bones are the humerus, the radius, the ulna, the femur, the tibia and the fibula. The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: flat bones long bones Muscle Tissues 12. What are the types of muscle tissues? What morphological features differentiate those types? There are three types of muscle tissue: skeletal striated muscle tissue, cardiac striated muscle tissue and smooth muscle tissue. Striated muscles present transversal stripes under microscopic view and their fibers (cells) are multinucleate (in skeletal) or may have more than one nucleus (in cardiac). Smooth muscle does not present transversal stripes and has spindle-shaped fibers, each of which has only one nucleus. The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: muscle tissue 13. Which type of muscle tissue moves bones?
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Bones are moved by the skeletal striated muscles. These muscles are voluntary (controlled by volition). The Musculoskeletal System Review - Image Diversity: skeletal striated muscle tissue 14. Which type of muscle tissue contracts and relaxes the chambers of the heart?
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  • Spring '16
  • kate
  • Musculoskeletal System Review

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