And in accordance with performance practice we hear

This preview shows page 16 - 19 out of 23 pages.

And, in accordance with performance practice, we hear the minuet, then  the trio, followed by a return to the minuet (without the repeat), creating  an overall form that we refer to as a  composite ternary form,  A B A. We’ll examine the Minuet and Trio with the scores in Discussion Board  #4.  For now, let’s listen again to Professor Steven Smith’s  performance.  In the Minuet, see if you can hear the rounding of the 
binary form.  In the Trio, see if you can hear that the binary form is not  rounded. Third Movement, Exposition The final movement of the “Moonlight” Sonata is dazzling.  The tempo  (“Presto agitato”) is so unrelentingly fast that it contributes a quality of  lightness to what might otherwise sound like a day of reckoning.  True,  this is a storm, but it’s thrilling.  For all its intense emotion, Beethoven manages to shape the movement  as a fairly straightforward  sonata-allegro form .  And beneath its frenetic energy, the underlying tonal structures are quite normal. Take, for example, the beginning of the Exposition.  The theme of  the  Principal Tonal Area  (mm. 1-14) consists of rapid sixteenth-note  arpeggios punctuated by eighth-note pairs of thunderous sforzando  chords.  Amidst the seeming chaos, a bass line decent, from tonic to dominant  (C#, B#, B, A, G#), leads us to the dominant (V) on the downbeat of m.  9.  Then the next six measures simply elaborate dominant harmony,  concluding with a strong Half Cadence in m. 14.  Let’s look and listen to a harmonic reduction of mm. 1-9. 1 Now let’s listen to Professor Steven Smith’s performance of the first 14  bars, as we follow the score. Third Movement, Exposition, Cont. Following the Principal Tonal Area, the  Transition —in the brief span of  just six bars—effects a modulation to the key of the minor dominant, G- sharp minor.  While a modulation to the relative major is more  customary, a modulation to the key of the minor dominant is not 
uncommon.  And the remainder of the Exposition plays out in the key of  G-sharp minor. In the  Secondary Tonal Area , we hear two distinct themes that are  much more melodic than the theme in the Principal Tonal Area.  And  there is even a  Closing theme that concludes the Exposition. Rather than trying to follow the score, let’s see if we can identify the  subsections of the Exposition as we listen and follow the time counter.   We have two opportunities, since the Exposition is repeated.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture