V immigration patterns a mid 19 th century english

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V. Immigration Patterns A. mid-19 th Century: English Scotch for land and farmers Scandavanian and Irish increase number of mining jobs or jobs with the railroad B. 1890-1914: Higher number of eastern and Southern Europe immigration, they are coming to the cities on the factories. Over population, Europe didn’t have the space. Fleeing urban blight. Fleeing persecution, Anti- seminist.
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C. demographics: D. numbers: 15 million 1890-1915 Ellis island main landing point. E. why come to America? 1. economic opportunity: they have heard the streets are paved with gold. They are expected to pave them for it. 2/3 are male unskilled and uneducated. 40% move back to the Europe. Come to US make money go home. Tales told. 2. corporate recruiting: corporations would actually go to Europe and pay passage and initial housing so they would have workers that work cheaply. 3. family connections: cities developed ethnic enclaves F. Assimilation & Americanization: 1. Horace Kallen, “Democracy versus the Melting Pot” (1915): how different generations respond to assimilation. First generation doesn’t want to , but second want to. 2. Assimilation for Protection: the more “American” you seemed the less likely you were to be displaced in your job. 3. Nativism: nationalism based on place of birth and ethnicity instead of morals. Political side: active attempts to restrict immigration especially after WWI. G. Restricting Immigration: 1. Chinese Exclusion Act (1882): There were about 200,000 most of them in Cali, industrious railroad workers, ran laundries, suspended immigration of new Chinese and put a stop to naturalization that were here, could not gain citizenship. Originally adopted to last 10 years but renewed for ten years and then made permanently. 2. Immigration Act (1921): Establish quotas, cannot exceed 3% according to the 1910 census of their kind. 3. National Origins Act (1924): modifies Immigration Act drops from 3%-2%, pushes the number back to census of 1890. Numbers drop tremendously. Significant drop. Ethnic hierarchy placed legally, and put in place socially. Highest stock is English and French kind of god, The ones from Eastern and Southern Europe bad and seen as somehow lesser. People lie about ethnicity. Bans all Asian immigration, aimed at Japanese now. H. Eugenics: Nativism meets “Science” with new sciences that develop include evolutionary you get a shift to genetics to inferiority and Hereditary determines it all, better living through better upbringing. Inter breeding with them (inferior nationalities) will weaken the proper
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American race. Helped to resurge the KKK. Fear of jobs taking away and racial suicide.
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