True gamers were unimpressed with the Sonic the Hedgehog game but enough people

True gamers were unimpressed with the sonic the

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“True gamers” were unimpressed with the Sonic the Hedgehog game, but enough people were drawn to the cute hedgehog to swing their purchases from Nintendo to Sega. Sonic whirled across the screen and impatiently tapped his foot when inactive, giving 3 Bits are tiny particles of computer matter that essentially allows for more action and better graphics. 18
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Sega what it desperately needed: popular software. Genesis sales escalated and Nintendo worried. Prior to Genesis, Yamauchi worried little about competitors, especially a small company like Sega. However, Sega would create the competition the video game market was looking for. More importantly for non-Nintendo video game companies was that third party licensing companies now could choose between Nintendo, Sega, or other companies (See Diagram 2). Sonic helped to open up a market that once seemed impermeable. Impressively, though, Nintendo sustained control over the market with their 8-bit system, and they had yet to release their new 16-bit Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). NCL was reluctant at first because they received complaints from consumers who did not want to buy more hardware and software that was incompatible with their previous Nintendo investments. Nonetheless, the SNES was released in the fall of 1990. The quality of the system was easily noticeable but consumers anticipated the release of top games like Donkey Kong Country and Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario World 2 . In 1995 Nintendo celebrated the sale of their one-billionth game cartridge. BIT WARS Technological advancements in chip technology would characterize the next generation of video game consoles. A once Nintendo dominated industry was now increasingly competitive. The 16-bit machines were past maturity, so the question became: who dare leap past 16-bit technology first? It was simply a matter of time. Sega came out in the late 90’s with an impressive 128-bit Dreamcast machine, but over flooded the market with mediocre systems during a short period of time. Sega and Nintendo consoles began on a path dependent scale (Patton, 2004), but now, Sega no longer makes 19
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home video game consoles. Nintendo entered with Virtual Boy, a console worn on the head, where gamers played through a goggle-like device. It did not do as well as expected. Nintendo followed with Nintendo 64 (N 64), but it was too late. Even though Super Mario 64 was touted as the best video game of all time by some critics, Sony’s Play Station had already grabbed the next generation of gamers. Sony, the electronic entertainment giant, entered the market with its Play Station in 1994. Instantly, there was a new leader in the video game console market that was once dominated by Nintendo. In 1988 Sony had an agreement with Nintendo to develop a CD-ROM drive for the Super Famicom and SNES. In 1991, however, Nintendo surprisingly announced that it had entered an agreement with a separate company, Philips, to develop a CD-ROM platform for Super Nintendo (Hancock, 2002). The
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  • Winter '13
  • MartinKenney
  • Nintendo, Nintendo Entertainment

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