Created by Expeditionary Learning on behalf of Public Consulting Group Inc

Created by expeditionary learning on behalf of public

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Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc. © Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G8:M2A:U1:L2 June 2014 2
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GRADE 8: MODULE 2A: UNIT 1: LESSON 2 Taking a Stand: Equal Rights for Women Agenda Teaching Notes (continued) In this module, beginning with Shirley Chisholm’s speech and continuing with To Kill a Mockingbird, students will encounter racially charged words and phrases. It is important to stop for a moment to address this language. Be sure to explain that people used to use language like “old darkey,” but that it isn’t acceptable to use that language anymore because it is from a time when African Americans were not afforded equal rights or protection in the United States. If students react emotionally to this language, consider giving them space to process their feelings, whether it is in writing, in an open class discussion, or in private with you. In advance: Read Shirley Chisholm’s “Equal Rights for Women.” Post: Learning targets. Lesson Vocabulary Materials taking a stand, advantages, disadvantages; characteristics “Equal Rights for Women” by Shirley Chisholm (one per student) Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (one per student) Document camera “Equal Rights for Women”: Lesson 2 Text-Dependent Questions (one per student) “Equal Rights for Women”: Lesson 2 Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference) Created by Expeditionary Learning, on behalf of Public Consulting Group, Inc. © Public Consulting Group, Inc., with a perpetual license granted to Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, Inc. NYS Common Core ELA Curriculum G8:M2A:U1:L2 June 2014 3
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GRADE 8: MODULE 2A: UNIT 1: LESSON 2 Taking a Stand: Equal Rights for Women Opening Meeting Students’ Needs A. Engaging the Reader (3 minutes) Invite students to partner up with someone nearby and share the Advantages/Disadvantages t-chart they completed for homework. Provide about two minutes for this, then share with them that in the future they will think more about the advantages and disadvantages of using photographs and other media types. B. Review Learning Targets (2 minutes) Invite a student to read aloud the first learning target: “I can cite the evidence that Shirley Chisholm uses to support her claims in ‘Equal Rights for Women.’” Ask students: “What does it mean to cite evidence?” Cold call on a student. Ideally students will understand that to cite means to name or mention details from the text. Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.
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  • Fall '14
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  • Shirley Chisholm, Public Consulting Group, Expeditionary Learning

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