Simile achebe introduces the reader to okonkwo the

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 196

This preview shows page 80 - 82 out of 196 pages.

Simile: Achebe introduces the reader to Okonkwo, the protagonist, by describing him in terms of fire, a recurring comparison in the novel. “That was many years ago, twenty years or more, and during this time Okonkwo’s fame had grown like a bush-fire in the harmattan.” (Pg. 3) The author uses this comparison of unlike things to give the reader an understanding of how quickly Okonkwo had risen to fame and prosperity. Metaphor: “Among the Ibo the art of conversation is regarded very highly, and proverbs are the palm- oil with which words are eaten.” (Pg. 7) This proverbial metaphor introduces the reader to Achebe’s use of African language to express the belief system of the Ibo culture. Palm-oil is rich oil used in cooking and is at the core of Ibo life. Here, Achebe wants the reader to realize that his use of proverbs aid in understanding and empathizing with the people in the novel. Personification: Giving life to the music of the village, Achebe presents the instruments as a living part of the tribe in order to stress their importance in this culture. “The drums beat and the flutes sang and the spectators held their breath.” (Pg. 3) In the following Figurative Language Chart , identify which type of figurative language is being used in the first space, and then explain the element in the second space. Note to Teacher: This is an excellent activity for group work, as some more literal minded-students may have difficulty understanding the comparisons being made. If students finish early, consider giving extra credit or bonus points to those who can find other examples of figurative language on their own.
Image of page 80

Subscribe to view the full document.

Name: ________________________________ Date:_________________ Part Two Chapters 14-19 Figurative Language Objective: Identifying and interpreting figurative language Activity Figurative language is language used in non-literal fashion for the purpose of description or emphasis. Chinua Achebe uses a wealth of figurative language in Things Fall Apart, making his characters and images come alive for the reader. Study the following examples of the different types of figurative language used by Achebe. Simile: Achebe introduces the reader to Okonkwo, the protagonist, by describing him in terms of fire, a recurring comparison in the novel. “That was many years ago, twenty years or more, and during this time Okonkwo’s fame had grown like a bush-fire in the harmattan.” (Pg. 3) The author uses this comparison of unlike things to give the reader an understanding of how quickly Okonkwo had risen to fame and prosperity. Metaphor: “Among the Ibo the art of conversation is regarded very highly, and proverbs are the palm- oil with which words are eaten.” (Pg. 7) This proverbial metaphor introduces the reader to Achebe’s use of African language to express the belief system of the Ibo culture. Palm-oil is rich oil used in cooking and is at the core of Ibo life. Here, Achebe wants the reader to realize that his use of proverbs aid in understanding and empathizing with the people in the novel.
Image of page 81
Image of page 82

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes