42 NAACP National Association for the Advancement of Colored People founded in

42 naacp national association for the advancement of

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42. NAACP- National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, founded in 1909 to abolish segregation and discrimination, to oppose racism and to gain civil rights for African Americans, got Supreme Court to declare grandfather clause unconstitutional. 43. CORE- Congress of Racial Equality, and organization founded in 1942 that worked for black civil rights 44. “The Happy Homemaker”- Reinforced by media. Reality = more women working outside the home 45. The Beats (Bohemians)- 1950s; celebrated spontaneity (ex: Kerouac and the Merry
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Pranksters) jazz, drugs, sexuality; challenged conformity and authority of America by rejecting traditions and emphasizing individualism; inspiration for counterculture of 1960s. 46. Rock ‘N’ Roll- Became a popular music genre in the fifties with the introduction of Elvis Presley 47. Alan Freed- A disc jockey who began playing a unique style of music at the time called "rhythm-and-blues" on a Cleveland radio show, who gained a wide following from black and white teenagers due to his on-air attitude and style, gaining a wide following for this new genre that evolved into rock-and-roll, coined it. 48. Elvis Presley: Elvis Aaron Presley was an American singer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King." 49. “The day the music died”: On this day in 1959, rising American rock stars Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson are killed when their chartered Beechcraft Bonanza plane crashes in Iowa a few minutes after takeoff from Mason City on a flight headed for Moorhead, Minnesota. Investigators blamed the crash on bad weather and pilot error. Holly and his band, the Crickets, had just scored a No. 1 hit with "That'll Be the Day." 50. Earl Warren: He was a prominent 20th century leader of American politics and law. Elected California governor in 1942, Warren secured major reform legislation during his three terms in office. After failing to claim the Republican nomination for the presidency, he was appointed the 14th chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1953. The landmark case of his tenure was Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), in which the Court unanimously determined the segregation of schools to be unconstitutional. 51. “Separate but Equal”: The doctrine that racial segregation is constitutional as long as the facilities provided for blacks and whites are roughly equal. This doctrine was long used to support segregation in the public schools and a variety of public facilities, such as transportation and restaurants, where the facilities and services for blacks were often clearly inferior. 52. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas: 1954 - The Supreme Court overruled Plessy v. Ferguson, declared that racially segregated facilities are inherently unequal and ordered all public schools desegregated.
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