TINA_Advanced_Topics.pdf

There are several target functions you can choose

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There are several target functions you can choose depending upon the analysis mode of the optimization (DC or AC). For DC optimization problems, you’ll need DC goal functions. When you click on a meter with the special target selector cursor, a dialog box appears showing several goal functions: Click on the DC Goal Functions… button. Another dialog box appears which allows you to set a DC goal function:
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To optimize to a target Value, enter the desired value. To optimize to a Maximum or Minimum, select the appropriate option. For AC optimization problems, you’ll need AC goal functions. With a meter selected, click on the AC Table… or on the AC Goal Functions… button. The AC Table supports a special AC goal function defined by a series of frequency and amplitude values. Using these frequency-amplitude pairs, an AC transfer function can be defined. You can access other AC goal functions by pressing the AC Goal Functions… button. Here you’ll find Center Frequency, High Pass, Band Pass, and Low Pass target functions, as well as Minimum and Maximum target functions. You can combine these functions, effectively setting more than one criterion. Now that you have established the target details, you must identify the control object(s) and their parameter(s) to be determined by optimization. To select a component, click on the Analysis.Control Object menu item or on the Select Control Object speed button . A special cursor will appear in the schematic editor window, waiting for you to identify the component to which the
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optimized parameter belongs. If you want TINA to optimize using more than one component, repeat the procedure for the other components. When you point at the component and click, TINA will display all of its associated parameters in a dialog window. Highlight the parameter to be determined by the optimization process, press the Select button, and enter the Start and End values for the variation of this component’s value. If the desired parameter belongs to a catalog component, or if it is an excitation attribute, you must first select the semiconductor or waveform type so that you can access the appropriate data sheet. The selected parameter will be varied in the range between the Start and End values while TINA searches for the optimum result at the target. If no optimum is found, then the range will have to be enlarged. If there is more than one optimum case in the range, TINA will only find one of them. If you suspect that this is the case, try using multiple, narrower ranges, each of which has one or fewer optimums. You can use the Remove button to deselect a previously assigned control object or optimization target. Optimization is useful not only in the design of electronic circuits, but in teaching, where you can use it to construct examples and problems. Let us see some examples.
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Two examples Example 1: Differential Amplifier (DC Optimization) This example illustrates how to use the DC Optimization to set the operating point of a differential amplifier.
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