Socrates repeatedly says the guardians will love and

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4.Socrates repeatedly says the guardians will love and do whatever is in the best interest of the city (e.g., 413c). They must be rulers of themselves and overcome desire. To ensure it, the guardians must be educated, tested, made to suffer, exposed to fears and pleasures, and compete to see who among them will not be easily deceived. Such tests are what come to distinguish true guardians (gold) from auxillaries (silver). Along the way, it seems the way to get them to act in the interest of the city is to tell them a “noble lie.” Why? Do we tell similar “noble lies” to get people to act for the common good?
5.The Myth of the Metals (414-417) is a narrative that Socrates does seem to approve of forpopular consumption. What is the Myth of the Metals? Is it a narrative of biological determinism? A justification for class division and inequality? A eugenics program?
6. It appears that education is not enough to ensure the guardians will rule for the good of the citywithout also taking away their private property and families (416d-417b). What does that accomplish?
Book IV

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