Attention to the culture of dress within the

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Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 3
Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach
Boyle/Holben
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attention to the culture of dress within the organization. You can be somewhat casual for some types of employers, but it is better to dress too professionally than too informally. Check with your career center to get advice about proper dress. Arrive to the interview on time. If your interview is off campus, consider taking a trial run to the location prior to the day of your interview to determine how long it takes to travel to the interview site. Be mindful of traffic volume at certain times of the day and plan accordingly. The interviewer expects you to be on time, regardless of the weather or morning commute.
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Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach
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Chapter 8 / Exercise 3
Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach
Boyle/Holben
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Follow up. It is important to follow up any interview with a thank-you card, handwritten or otherwise. Many times the person to whom you applied for the job is not the person who you actually interviews you. Prior to leaving the interview, ask for business cards of the professionals who you met so that you have their contact information. Send thank-you cards via e-mail to every person who interviewed you. Use this time to reiterate how your skills and experience match the company’s goals or to mention something you forgot to talk about during the interview. A handwritten thank-you card is also a nice touch. Few people actually use this method, and because it is rare, it always gets noticed! Careers and the New Economy For some, the reason to attend college is to get a good job. For others, it is to fulfill a dream of getting an education. For many first-generation college students, it's both. College not only helps you land a better job but also helps you become an effective leader, prepares you for graduate school, enhances your critical thinking and problem- solving skills, and elevates your societal status based on merit. Over the past few years, the economy has experienced fluctuations not seen in your or your parents’ lifetimes. In 2012, the unemployment rate for students with new bachelor’s degrees was 8.9 percent. This rate is high, but it’s a shattering 22.9 percent for job seekers with a recent high school diploma and an unthinkable 31.5 percent for recent high school dropouts. 1 The good news is that employers will likely hire many college students in the next few years. Economic uncertainty is a reality, and although a degree is one of the best weapons a job seeker can wield in the fight for employment and earnings, it is important to make decisions about your course of study and career path based on information about yourself and your economic need. CHARACTERISTICS OF TODAY'S ECONOMY In many ways today’s economy is different from previous economies. It is worldwide and has new characteristics. A Global Economy. Many industries are multinational, existing in overseas markets as well as seeking cheaper labor, capital, and resources abroad. Factories around the world built to similar standards can turn out essentially the same products. In addition, the overall ratio of United States college graduates to college graduates worldwide fell substantially in the first decade of the twenty-first century and stands to drop even

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