These increased values exceed those of public

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in addition to their salary. These increased values exceed those of public practice including uniformed services and government. In Australia, the profession wide average income was $137,000 in 2016 and this has declined compared to other professions for the past 30 years whilst graduate unemployment has doubled between 2006 and 2011. The financial rewards for veterinary specialists proved impressive in a 2017 compensation survey sent to veterinarians in the US. Ophthalmologists and radiologists could earned more than $445,468 per year. Pathologists earned more than $367,000 per year, and veterinary surgeons earned more than $390,061 per year, and lab animal medicine specialists could earn more than $246,000 per year. Veterinary cardiologists topped the survey with responses averaging $624,640 and anesthesiologists with $565,200. In order to practice, vets must complete both an appropriate degree in veterinary medicine, and in most cases must be registered with the relevant governing body for their jurisdiction. Degrees in veterinary medicine culminate in the award of a veterinary science degree, although the title varies by region. For instance, in North America, graduates will receive a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, whereas in the United Kingdom or India they would be awarded
Loring 6 a Bachelor's degree in Veterinary Science, Surgery or Medicine, and in Ireland graduates receive a Medicinae Veterinariae Baccalaureus . In continental Europe, the degree of Doctor Medicinae Veterinariae or Doctor Veterinariae Medicinae is granted. The award of a bachelor's degree was previously commonplace in the United States, but the degree name and academic standards were upgraded to match the 'doctor' title used by graduates. Comparatively few universities have veterinary schools that offer degrees which are accredited to qualify the graduates as registered vets. For example, there are 30 in the United States, 5 in Canada, and 8 in the United Kingdom . Due to this scarcity of places for veterinary degrees, admission to veterinary school is competitive and requires extensive preparation. In the United States in 2007, approximately 5,750 applicants competed for the 2,650 seats in the 28 accredited veterinary schools, with an acceptance rate of 46%. With competitive admission, many schools may place heavy emphasis and consideration on a candidate's veterinary and animal experience. Formal experience is a particular advantage to the applicant, often consisting of work with veterinarians or scientists in clinics, agribusiness, research, or some area of health science. Less formal experience is also helpful for the applicant to have, and this includes working with animals on a farm or ranch or at a stable or animal shelter and basic overall animal exposure. In the United States, approximately 80% of admitted students are female. In the early history of veterinary medicine of the United States, most veterinarians were males. However, in the 1990s this ratio reached parity, and now it has been reversed.

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