As Norberg and Rucker 2020 discuss in their article within The Conversation The

As norberg and rucker 2020 discuss in their article

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As Norberg and Rucker (2020) discuss in their article within The Conversation, “The coronavirus outbreak is not only a time of uncertainty, but also a period in which many of us are experiencing social isolation. Both of these factors can psychologically motivate people to buy things they don’t need. Feeling unable to tolerate uncertainty is associated with more extreme hoarding behaviour. Hoarding entails the collection of more items than can be feasibly used, to the point of impeding the functionality of a home. Even though the behaviours we’re seeing may not be “hoarding” in this sense, they’re likely driven by the same psychological mechanisms.
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One of the strongest predictors of hoarding behaviour is an individual’s perceived inability to tolerate distress. If it’s in a person’s general nature to avoid distress, they may be at risk of buying more products than they can feasibly use during the pandemic. For such people, it may be difficult to believe authorities when they announce supermarkets will not close. Or, if they do believe them, they may decide it’s best to “prep”, just in case things change. The coronavirus also reminds many people of their own mortality, and this can lead to an increase in spending to offset fear. Even if a person typically feels able to handle distress, they may still end up buying more than they need. Seeing empty shelves can trigger an urge to snatch what is left. Research on the “scarcity heuristic” suggests we assume items are more valuable if they are in low supply. Also, consumer goods are more than functional. Products and brands also serve psychological purposes and can change how we feel. For example, some people turn to alcohol to alleviate anxiety or distress.” 1 From this we can take that there is the potential for a relationship between our ‘hoarding’ and sense of future wellbeing in the Covid-19 crisis. Research question: Is there a relationship between hoarding and sense of uncertainty or level of distress in respect to the Covid-19 public health emergency? Aims: To investigate the extent of hoarding amongst the households of 400337 as a result of the Covid-19 public health emergency To investigate the sense of uncertainty and distress amongst the households of 400337 as a result of the Covid-19 public health emergency To investigate whether there is a relationship between hoarding and uncertainty or level of distress as a result of the Covid-19 public health emergency 1 Norberg and Rucker (2020 ) “Psychology can explain why coronavirus drives us to panic buy. It also provides tips on how to stop”, The Conversation 20/3/2020, - buy-it-also-provides-tips-on-how-to-stop-134032
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Hypotheses: (as this is a quantitative study, we can have hypotheses or predictions) A hypothesis is a testable prediction derived from theory (it is inductive). The general structure of hypothesis-based research is that there is ‘the hypothesis’ being tested (H 1 ).
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  • Null hypothesis, Household income in the United States, household wellbeing

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